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9 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984
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  • 1. Where's Crestmont? by Menius, Opal
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    During the First World War, Crestmont became a booming lumber town. Located in the present day Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Crestmont was home to Suncrest Lumber Company employees. The town specialized in milling spruce that was used in war industries. Electricity was cheap and work plentiful. Following the war, however, Suncrest Lumber Company pulled out, taking with them the houses and buildings they had built. A single house remained so that the lumber company could maintain property rights. The author reconnects with her childhood as she locates the old town. Today, all that remains of Crestmont is a single rock chimney.
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    Record #:
    8162
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  • 4. Dodson and Nellie Ramseur by Gallagher, Gary W.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    University of Virginia professor Gary Gallagher writes about Stephen Dodson Ramseur and his love Ellen “Nellie” Richmond. Ramseur grew up in Lincolnton and attended the United States Military Academy. He was a member of the last full class to graduate before the Civil War. When war broke out Ramseur resigned his commission and joined the Confederate Army. He quickly rose in rank, becoming the youngest West Point graduate to become a Confederate major general. Ramseur fought at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, Shenandoah Valley, and Cedar Creek. Ramseur married Ellen in 1863. On September 16, 1864, he received word that Ellen had given birth to a child, but the message did not describe the baby's sex or health. Ramseur never found out, he was killed in battle two days later at Cedar Creek. Ellen remained in deep mourning the remainder of her life
    Source:
    Record #:
    8167
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  • 5. The Booze Haulers by Jeter, Frank
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Following World War II, many North Carolinians wanted a drink of liquor. Many counties, however, enforced dry laws. The need for alcoholic beverages gave rise to the tradition of the mountain moonshiners. The most exciting aspect of the moonshining business was transporting the liquor. Haulers devised new ways to avoid the police. One way was to reinforce a car's rear springs. This kept the car level when hauling a heavy load. When a car was not loaded, the rear springs lifted the car's rear, giving away a hauler's identity. Contrary to popular belief, confrontations between police and moonshiners were usually nonviolent. As counties repealed their dry laws, the demand for illegal alcohol decreased, but the moonshine industry left a legacy of fast cars and high speeds.
    Source:
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8165
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