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8 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985
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  • 1. The Man Who Made Electricity Talk by Arthur, Billy
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Junius L. Clemmons, a native of Clemmonsville, developed a system of dots and dashes that could be sent through copper wire. Clemmons developed his communications device in 1833 and sent the design to a Mr. Page, who was a professional electrician in Washington, D.C. Clemmons never heard back from Page. In 1837, Clemmons read a newspaper article that told of Samuel Morse and Page creating a telegraph system. Clemmons then discovered that Page worked in the U.S. Patent Office and could not issue a patent to himself. Page, therefore, used his friend, Samuel Morse, and earned a patent to the telegraph. Clemmons wrote an article in the Washington Globe claiming that he was the true inventor of the telegraph. Page admitted receiving Clemmons design, but he denied copying it. Clemmons forgave Page for his betrayal and enjoyed a successful law firm in Kentucky, becoming the oldest practicing lawyer in the nation before his death.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8400
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  • 6. Appleton Oaksmith, A Doomed Dreamer by Barbour, Ruth P.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Appleton Oaksmith was born in Maine, the son of parents who were to become prominent in the Victorian literary world. Oaksmith left Maine for a life of adventure on the seas and made voyages to China, Panama, Nicaragua, Peru, and the Congo. During the Civil War, he was arrested for slave trading but escaped from jail. He began blockade-running, transporting arms and ammunition to the Confederacy. After the war he became a correspondent for the LONDON GLOBE, covering the Franco-Prussian War. Later he bought land in Beaufort. He invested in the railroad industry and was a member of the North Carolina House of Representatives in 1874. On July 4, 1879, Oaksmith lost three of his children in a boating accident and, he retreated from public life. He died in 1887 and is buried at Hollywood, his Beaufort estate.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 11, Apr 1985, p20-22,, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8406
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  • 7. Eagles Are Here by Adderton, Bobbi
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The bald eagle is making a comeback in North Carolina. Only one eagle was spotted in the state during 1982, compared to thirteen in 1985. A state ban on the pesticide DDT and the eagle's designation as a protected species are reasons for the bird's population growth. Dr. Richard Brown of the Carolina Raptor Center in Charlotte believes the state can do more. One of the biggest dangers to the state's bald eagles is ignorant hunters. Dr. Brown believes that the state should, as some states do, require a bird identification test before granting a gun license. Dr. Brown also advocates a reward system, under which private companies would grant money for any information on illegal hunting practices. Rewards up to $20,000 would provide sufficient motivation in turning over poachers, claims Dr. Brown.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8405
    Full Text:
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