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8 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 51 Issue 7, Dec 1983
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  • 1. The James City War by Pearce, T. H.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    James City got its name from Captain Horace James, a former Yankee army chaplain, who established a camp across the river from New Bern, where many freed slaves settled. When asked to leave by the owner of the land, James A. Bryan, they refused, claiming the area was under martial law when they settled there. Bryan and his descendants battled in the courts for ownership of the land and finally won their case in 1893. By order of Governor Elias Carr, state troops moved into New Bern, prepared to evict the residents. The governor averted an outright war by offering the 557 families living in James City a chance to sign a lease, under which they would pay the Bryan family for the land. The only casualty of the “James City War” was Lt. Col. David Bogart, who was thrown from his horse and killed during a parade for the troops.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 7, Dec 1983, p17, 18, 30, por  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8280
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  • 2. How the Movies Started in N.C. by Arthur, Billy
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    North Carolina has long been a pioneer in the movie industry. The state was the site of the first all-cartoon show, the first double feature, and showed the first “talkies” in the South. Charlotte served as a movie distribution center during the 1920s and was considered a “second Hollywood.” The first movies seen by North Carolinians were shown by George Bailey and Fox Howard in 1906. The two men showed a movie in New Bern's Masonic Theatre. The movie was a success and the men took their movie to Wilmington's Bijou Theatre on December 24, 1906. The Bijou was the state's first theatre built exclusively to show movie pictures. In 1921, North Carolina produced a film on the Lost Colony which was shown all over the state. It was America's first educational film. Today, the movie industry is still thriving in North Carolina. In 1980 the N.C. Commerce Department created the N.C. Film Office, who predicts that the film industry will boost the state's economy $75 million to $100 million annually.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8815
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  • 4. Bring Back the “Depression” Toys by Hinkle, Bob
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Children raised during the Great Depression were sometimes forced to play with home-made toys. That did not matter to them, or course, as home-made toys can be just as much fun as those bought at a store. Today, grandparents raised during the depression years can pass along their knowledge of home-made toys to their grandchildren, as the author did when his young granddaughter made a recent week-long visit. One such depression era toy is the shoebox streetcar. Made out of a shoebox, children can cut out windows, attach a string, and light a candle inside to create a night-time toy that glows in the dark. Children wishing to grow tall like adults may want to create tin-can stilts. These stilts are not as dangerous as those used in the circus, but they still make children feel ten-feet tall. Tying a string to two halves old oatmeal boxes creates a toy telephone while a candle lantern makes for a fun night-time exploration. These toys are not only fun for children, but also teach them a history lesson about life during the Great Depression.
    Source:
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8821
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  • 5. World Class Ambassador by Singletary, Annie Lee
     
    Abstract:
    Juanita Martin Bryant recently became president of the General Federation of Women's Clubs. The Yadkin County native began her volunteer service in 1953 and now heads an organization with over ten million members in forty six countries. Bryant lives in the GFWC's presidential home in Washington, D.C., but she rarely gets to spend time there. Instead, she is constantly traveling the world attending to federation business that ranges from sweatshop reform, supporting the Marshall Plan, promoting adult education, and encouraging the restoration of Independence Hall. Bryant has traveled to such places as Cambodia, Guam, Taiwan, Bangladesh, and Saudi Arabia, and averages a sixteen-hour workday. She has also served the state as regional director for the North Carolina School of the Arts, been a member of the North Carolina Historical Commission, and served on the Governor's Commission on Education.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8819
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  • 6. Slam Dunk! by Barrier, Smith
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    North Carolina has long been a center for great college basketball. A major reason for this came from the creation of the North Carolina Coaching Clinic in 1949. The coaching clinic drew coaches from across the state to learn from the game's best minds. These coaches then used their knowledge in coaching their players. In this article Smith Barrier creates North Carolina's collegiate all-star basketball team. In order to be included on the all-star team players had to be born in North Carolina. A major problem quickly rises, however, when comparing the teams of today with those of the past. Barrier separates basketball history into two eras, with the incorporation of black athletes in the mid-1960s acting as the break between the two eras. Included on the Era I team were players such as Dickie Hemric, Walt Bellamy, and Lou Hudson who played between 1920 and 1964. Era II team members include players such as David Thompson, Phil Ford, Walter Davis, James Worthy, and Michael Jordan. Two coaches are included in Barrier's all-star list: Bones McKinney and Terry Holland.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8820
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  • 7. Making Strides in the Mountains by Morris, Peter W.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Every winter skiers flock toward western North Carolina and take advantage of the region's ski slopes. In addition to the traditional downhill skiing, cross-country skiing is gaining popularity. One factor leading to growing popularity of cross-country skiing is that it can be a group sport. Cross-country skiers can travel in groups and even stop for picnics on their outings. Downhill skiers do not have this luxury as it is primary a solo-sport. Jim and Tracy Wuenscher, of New River Outfitters in Boone, have worked to promote the sport in western North Carolina. Their efforts have paid off as the Moses Cone estate, and its twenty-five miles of cross-country skiing trails located along the Blue Ridge Parkway, is now open during the winter months. Park officials have also agreed to maintain road access to the park year-round.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8816
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