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8 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 51 Issue 6, Nov 1983
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  • 3. Joel Lane's House by Cheshire, Elizabeth Silver
     
    Abstract:
    The Joel Lane house, located in Raleigh, was where the decision as to where to locate the state's capitol building was made. The home, built in 1760, was home to Joel Lane's family. Lane was born in Halifax County to parents who had emigrated from England. He served in the General Assembly and in 1770 introduced a bill that created Wake County. Following independence, the state legislature decided to locate the state's capital in Wake County. Lane hosted the nine-member committee whose job was to decide where in Wake County to place the capital. After an amusing night of entertainment in the Lane house, the committee decided to buy 1,000 acres of property that belonged to Joel Lane. This property became the site of North Carolina's capital. The home was bought by the Wake County of Colonial Dames in 1927. They began a major renovation project on the home in 1968 and the house was opened to the public in 1976.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8812
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  • 5. The Saturday Bath Ritual by Arthur, Billy
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    As a child, Billy Arthur spent his summers with family members in Cabarrus County. Saturdays took the appearance of small holidays as the whole family took baths throughout the day so that all would be clean for Sunday morning church. Bathing was done in order from youngest to oldest and ended when the oldest male finished his bath. During the summer months rural families usually used an outdoor tin wash tub, but some were lucky enough to have a porcelain tub. In the cold winter months, however, bathers stood in a wash bowl and sponged themselves in front of a fire. While progress has made the bathing process much easier, it has also taken away the simple pleasures that the weekly Saturday bath created.
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8807
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  • 7. Kids and Toadstools by Padgett, Bob
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Bob Padgett began collecting and eating mushrooms while living in the Shenandoah Valley. At first, the neighborhood children were hesitant about collecting mushrooms; however, as the author continued to eat mushrooms without getting sick, the children became interested in the hobby. Many people know that some mushrooms are poisonous to humans, but few know which ones these are. Almost all poisonous mushrooms belong to the family Amanita. Before one begins collecting mushrooms for consumption purposes, they should be familiar with which species belongs to the Amanita family. The neighborhood children soon became knowledgeable and even got their families hooked on eating wild mushrooms.
    Source:
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8809
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