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7 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983
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  • 1. A Treasure House of Languages by Gates, Nancy G.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The North Carolina Foreign Language Center was born in 1975. It is now housed at the Gillespie Street Branch Library in Fayetteville. The center was created through the Library Services and Construction Act, which mandated that certain funds to go toward materials for non-native English speakers. At the time, libraries throughout the state held some materials for non-native English speakers; however, the collections tended to be small and focused on particular groups. Marian Leath, then Assistant State Librarian, and David Warren, Director of Cumberland County Library, wrote the grant proposal for the North Carolina Foreign Language Center. The center now houses over 20,400 books and 2,000 tapes in over seventy languages. Materials are available to libraries throughout the state and nation through interlibrary loan. Cost in the interlibrary loan process has caused difficulties for the language center, but no other effective means of getting the materials to patrons has been found.
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    Record #:
    8658
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  • 2. The Pain and Bane of Uprooting by Bullard, Frances R.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Frances Bullard recalls her 1920s schools days in the North Carolina mountains. She began her education in a one-room-one-teacher school that was taught by a teacher from the Normal School in Asheville. As a student, Bullard received her first vaccination. Excitedly, she and her classmates traveled to Busbee School for diphtheria vaccinations. The student's excitement waned when they saw the first needle. Bullard also learned about brushing her teeth using a toothbrush and a new product called Colgate toothpaste. Students were also taught how to make mayonnaise and light-bread sandwiches. Bullard's school grew, and she eventually attended a high school that had a separate teacher for each subject. While eager to learn new things as a child, Bullard is now returning to the mountains and the old-time mountain ways.
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    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8657
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  • 4. Ecce Homo by Skipper, Tom F.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The painting “Ecce Homo” hangs in Wilmington's St. James Episcopal Church. It got there in a most unusual way. During King George's War, 1739-1748, the English and Spanish governments fought for power in the Caribbean. On September 4, 1748, two Spanish ships, the Fortuna and Loretta, arrived at the shore of the North Carolina town of Brunswick. The townspeople fled the area as the Spanish entered the town. The attackers plundered the city for several days before the colonists fought back. Under the leadership of militia captain William Dry, the colonists pushed the Spanish soldiers out of the town, killing ten and taking thirty prisoners. The Spanish retreated to their ships and shelled the town. The Fortuna caught fire and suddenly exploded, sinking in shallow water. Left without her companion, the Loretta sailed back down the Cape Fear River and headed out to sea. The Spanish had stored their plunder in the Fortuna, however, and fortunately the citizens of Brunswick were able to recover it. They also found the Captain's belongings, which included the painting “Ecce Homo.” They took the painting and placed it in a local church. Eventually, the painting was given to the St. James Episcopal Church in 1770.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983, p18-20, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8661
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  • 5. Dr. Kron and the Lost Gold by Hueneke, Lorraine M.
     
    Abstract:
    Dr. Francis Joseph Kron built his homestead at the foot of the Uwharrie Mountains in Stanley County during the 1830s. Kron was a medical doctor who would always travel to help a patient, no matter the difficulty in reaching them. According to his diary, Kron spent a lot of time traveling and learning new things. He also taught French at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and attended medical lectures at the University of Pennsylvania. Kron's daughters never married and, following the last daughter's death in 1910, the Kron home place fell into disrepair. A legend began that Kron had buried his fortune on his property but had invoked ghosts to keep anyone from ever taking it. Stories have since been told about people who tried to find Kron's gold but were stopped by ghouls. To this day, none of Kron's gold has been found. Either it doesn't exist or just maybe the ghosts have been successful in keeping it safe.
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    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8662
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  • 6. The First N.C. Skyscraper by McInnis, Frank G.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Charlotte leaders in 1905 wanted their city to have a “New South” image. To create this, they began construction on the city's first skyscraper. The building was twelve stories tall and was built by Washington, D.C., architect Frank P. Milburn. The structure was named the “Reality Building” and its grand opening was attended by President William Howard Taft. When the building was first opened in 1908, the city had population of 25,000, which meant that there was not enough demand to fill the building's space. By 1927, however, Charlotte's population had risen to over 82,000, and the Reality Building was in great demand. Two floors were added to the building and its name was changed to the “Independence Building.” The structure became outdated over time, and by the 1970s only the first floor was leased to businesses. The property was bought by Faison Associates in 1981 and demolished on September 27, 1981. A new twenty-story structure will be built in its place.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8660
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  • 7. I Remember the Protracted Meeting by Hoyt, Bessie Willis
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Bessie Hoyt recalls the two-week revivals she attended as a young girl at Davis, a coastal town on the North Carolina coast. The revivals were called protracted meetings, and they took place during the summer when farm work was light and people could spend time outdoors. Protracted meetings included all-day services that were interrupted only by meals. At the end of each day a hymn of invitation was sung as sinners walked forward and accepted the Lord. Hoyt remembers that the preachers always gave sermons about the wrath of God and his vengeance against sinners. Rarely was the God of love spoken about. At the end of the two-week meeting, all those who had been saved were baptized and accepted into the church. Then, the church members would travel to Core Island for an all-day picnic. Following the picnic, friends would sadly say their goodbyes and the revival was over. The protracted meetings were the forerunner to today's revival services.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 5, Oct 1983, p26-28, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8663
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