Access to articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983
< PREV PAGE OF 1



  • 2. O. Max Gardner and the Shelby Dynasty Part III by Albright, R. Mayne
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    O. Max Gardner's so-called Shelby Dynasty swept the 1936 state elections while taking a stance against Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal programs. Candidates supported by Gardner won both the governor's and lieutenant governor's offices. The next two campaigns, 1940 and 1944, were overshadowed by the Second World War, and no strong opponents rose to challenge the Gardner machine. In 1948, however, opponents did face off against the Shelby Dynasty. Returning soldiers and young citizens who grew up under Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal reforms were able to vote, and they wanted improvement. Both W. K. Scott and R. Mayne Albright ran against Gardner's candidate, Charles Johnson. W. K. Scott won the gubernatorial race and became the first farmer-governor since Elias Carr in 1892. Scott's victory also signaled the end of the Shelby Dynasty which, in addition to the Simmons Machine, had dominated North Carolina's politics for over a half century.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8510
    Full Text:
    Print View
  • 3. A Historic Gem is Preserved by Strother, Jake
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Harmony Hall was the home of Richard Caswell from 1777 till 1782. During this time, the Kinston home served as North Carolina's unofficial capital. Because New Bern was susceptible to British attack, Caswell, North Carolina's first Governor, moved the state's records to his home. Caswell gave Harmony Hall to his son, Richard, in 1782, where it remained in the family till 1824. Since then the home has served as a hospital, a church, a public library, and a Women's Club. In 1830, two one-story additions were built on each side. The Preservation for Harmony Hall Committee has recently completed its restoration of the home, and it now serves as a museum and social hall. Rooms, such as the second-story master bedroom, are restored to 18th-century condition, while the kitchen is furnished with modern appliances so that it can serve the Kinston Noon Rotary Club. Harmony Hall is Kinston's only 18th-century structure still standing.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 3, Aug 1983, p13-16, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8504
    Full Text:
    Print View
  • 5. Beginning at Buckhorn by Young, Kay Bowman
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Buckhorn Dam was built by the Cape Fear Power Company in the early 1900s. In 1908, the hydroelectric dam began producing power for Fayetteville. During the dam's construction the death of several workers and financial difficulties threatened the project. The Cape Fear Power Company was bought out by the New York firm Electric Bond & Share Company. Only six months after the dam began producing power, the EB&S added the Buckhorn Dam property to the company's holdings in Raleigh and Sanford, and formed the Carolina Power & Light Company. The dam was soon supported by coal power and later nuclear power. The Buckhorn hydroelectric dam was permanently close in 1963. When it first opened in 1908, the dam produced 2500 kilowatts of electricity. The new Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, located seven miles from Buckhorn Dam, produces 720 times as much electricity.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8507
    Full Text:
    Print View

< PREV PAGE OF 1