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9 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983
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  • 2. O. Max Gardner and the Shelby Dynasty Part II by Albright, R. Mayne
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The 1936 North Carolina gubernatorial race pitted three men against one other. In the one-party Democratic south, the winner of the Democratic primary was essentially the election winner. In the 1936 race, two different Democratic factions were represented, the conservative and the liberal. Clyde R. Hoey and A. H. Graham both ran as conservative Democrats. Hoey also enjoyed the backing of former governor, O. Max Gardner. While Gardner was not the current governor, he controlled the conservative faction that was known as the “Machine” or the “Shelby Dynasty.” Ralph W. McDonald ran as the liberal candidate, and he wished to create a New Deal for North Carolinians. Campaign debates centered on the creation of a sales tax that would help cover the state's debt. McDonald, a young newcomer from Illinois, was considered an underdog; however, his anti-tax policies quickly gained support. Hoey and McDonald won a runoff following the first primary. The campaign race between Hoey and McDonald grew ugly and has been described as one of the nastiest campaigns in the state's history. Hoey and the Shelby Dynasty swept the election as the liberal faction lost several other state races.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8475
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  • 3. You Had to Fit the Ruts by Fountain, Alvin M.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Before the automobile, wagons were the prime mode of local transportation. Wagons built in eastern North Carolina differed from those built in western North Carolina in the width of their track. Owing to the rough terrain, western buggies had a width of only fifty-four inches; those in the east had a width of sixty inches. Buggies that went on roads outside of their region experienced rough rides. This was rarely a problem, however, as few North Carolinians took their buggies far away from home. The automobile changed things. The first mass-produced cars, such as the Ford Model-T, came with a sixty-inch tread option, but by 1916, all cars were manufactured with a fifty-four-inch tread. This caused a lot of damage to roads in eastern North Carolina until the paving campaigns of the 1920s and 1940s.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8476
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  • 5. Bringing Beauty Back to Life by Bowie, Phil
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Dolls are now collectors' items that can be worth large amounts of money. Old dolls, however, are often in need of repair. Charlie and Carrie Miller of New Bern specialize in this craft. Both are retired teachers from New Jersey who decided to move south to enjoy their latter years. The Millers restore dolls' wardrobes, cosmetology, teeth, eyes, and bodies. Their talents have also been seen in rebuilding old homes. The Millers chose to buy one of New Bern's historic homes. The reconstruction is complete and the home is now a stop on New Bern's tour of homes. The Millers gained notoriety for standing up to the railroad industry. After restoring their historic home, passing coal trains were switched to another track that passed within a few feet of their home. The passing trains shook the ground so hard that the Millers feared the house might be shaken off its foundation. The two decided to stand in front of a train and make it stop as they hoped to gain media attention for their cause. As of publication, no decision has been made by the railroad to change the coal train's routes.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8479
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  • 6. I Remember the Old Depots by Thompson, Herb
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    North Carolina, like the entire South, experienced the railroad boom of the early 1900s. The author includes photos he collected into a scrapbook while working for the Winston-Salem line of the Southern Railroad. One piece of his collection is the drawing “The Old Depot” by C. D. Poage. This drawing incorporates many of the everyday events experienced by depot agents. Thompson describes the functions of tools shown in the drawing and comments on the depot agent's daily routines. Thompson also discusses the depot buildings and includes several pictures of depots located between Greensboro and North Wilkesboro. These buildings were constructed by railroad gangs and Thompson provides a picture of one of those gangs. Today several of the these buildings are being moved or restored, such as the depot in Rural Hall, that now serves as the offices to a weekly newspaper, and the Pineville depot, that is now a restaurant.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 2, July 1983, p22-26, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8481
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  • 8. Clubs Tar Heels Have Joined by
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    North Carolinians have always had a sense of humor and a desire to join clubs. Billy Arthur describes some of the state's historic lighthearted organizations, such as the Wilmington Whistling Society, the Cheerful Chitterling Chewers Club of Winston-Salem, the Calico Club of Washington, the Carolina Marriage Association of Charlotte, and the Squirrel Feeders Club of Raleigh. Many humorous clubs still exist today, such as the Bald-Headed Men of America from Morehead City and the I Could Kick Myself Brotherhood of Tarboro. Vance County's Ugly League only requires its members to be naturally ugly. Once open only to men, the club began allowing female members in 1982.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8478
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