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5 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 50 Issue 7, Dec 1982
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  • 1. When Core Sound Froze Over by Hoyt, Bessie Willis
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Disasters have struck those who live around Core Sound several times when severe winter weather brought icy conditions. For example, on January 11, 1886, a three-mast schooner, CHRISSIE WRIGHT, bound for her home port of New York, was overtaken by an extremely cold gale off of Cape Lookout. The cook and four crew members huddled down on the deck under a sail, but only the cook was still alive when a whaler was finally able to reach the ice-covered ship. In 1898, when the sound froze over, the fishing village of Davis, accessible only by boat, suffered near-famine conditions. Many people became ill, and several died. Close by, a ship, the PONTIAC, had shipwrecked. Survivors made a fire which produced a black column of smoke visible to the townspeople in Davis. Three rescuers set out and found the survivors and their ship full of molasses and grain. When the sound froze again in 1917, Davis's food supply again dwindled, but no one died.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8574
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  • 3. “The ACC” Grew Up in NC by Barrier, Smith
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The very first Atlantic Coast Conference basketball tournament was played in 1954 in Raleigh's Reynolds Coliseum. North Carolina State University won all three of the first ACC's. The tournament in 1954 sold out only on semifinals. Ticket prices began at $9 and $6 for season books, all four sessions and did not go up in price until 1958. Other ACC coaches requested that the tournament be moved out of Raleigh to a more neutral setting. In 1967, it was played in Greensboro and in 1968, in Charlotte. The tournament was partially televised for the first time in 1967 and by 1974, when NC State won the NCAA championship in Greensboro, NBC began to carry full coverage of the tournament. The ACC tournament then stayed in Charlotte for three years, while Greensboro underwent renovations. Non-state teams began protesting and finally the ACC tournament was moved out of North Carolina.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 7, Dec 1982, p11-13, 31, il  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8575
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