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2 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 50 Issue 6, Nov 1982
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  • 1. The Senator and the Simmons Machine, Part I by Albright, R. Mayne
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Furnifold McLendel Simmons, known as “The Senator,” was born in New Bern in 1854. Although he did not attend law school, he passed both of his law examinations and practiced law in Jones County, New Bern, and Goldsboro. The seventeen-year period following Reconstruction was controlled by the Democratic Party, an era called the Bourbon Democracy. When people's cries for tax reform went unheeded, a new political party called the Populist Party was formed to run against both Democrats and Republicans in 1892. During this period of upheaval, Simmons accepted the position of chairman of the state Democratic party and helped to put Elias Carr in the governor's office, also in 1892. These activities were the beginning of what would be known as “the Simmons Machine.” In 1898, Simmons was again appointed chairman of the Democratic Party, which used the platform “Black Supremacy or White Supremacy in North Carolina?” and employed red-shirted horsemen to keep African Americans from voting. Democrats regained control of the General Assembly, and in 1899 Simmons proposed a suffrage amendment and grandfather clause to discourage African American voters. Simmons helped elect Charles Brantley Aycock, the Democratic nominee, to the governor's office in 1900, and from 1901-1931 Simmons served as a United States Senator.\r\n
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 6, Nov 1982, p8-12, 31, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8572
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  • 2. When Tar Heels Mourned Jeff Davis by Pearce, T. H.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederate States of America, died on December 6, 1889, in New Orleans. Memorial services were held throughout the South as his body lay in state in the New Orleans City Hall. Although almost 100,000 people came to pay their respects, many more could not attend because of the expense and distance involved. But in 1893, when Davis's body was being moved to Richmond, the eight-car funeral train included Raleigh as one of its stops. The train arrived in Raleigh on May 30, 1893, at 1:10 p.m. to a crowd of thousands. Confederate veterans served as pallbearers. The casket was taken into the rotunda of the Capitol building and a service was held. Just after 3 p.m., the casket was taken back to the train station and arrived in Richmond at 3 a.m. on May 31. Jefferson Davis was finally laid to rest at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond on the afternoon of May 31, 1893.\r\n
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 6, Nov 1982, p23-24, 29, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8573
    Full Text:
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