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3 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 50 Issue 2, July 1982
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  • 1. The Cure-All of General Clingman by Arthur, Billy
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Born in Surry County July 27, 1812, Thomas L. Clingman attended law school at UNC-Chapel Hill and served as a general in the Confederate Army. After being thrown from a horse and later shot in the leg, Clingman applied wet tobacco leaves to his injuries and discovered that this treatment lessened both the pain and swelling within a day. Clingman published a pamphlet in1885 titled “The Tobacco Remedies – The Greatest Medical Discovery.” Prominent Tar Heels including several doctors provided testimonials as to the efficacy and various cures that tobacco offered. Clingman later sold a tobacco leaf cake which could be taken apart and made into a poultice or ointment. Tobacco's healing properties were never definitive or fully accepted when Clingman died in 1897.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 2, July 1982, p9-10, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8551
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  • 2. The Immortal Six Hundred by Pearce, T. H.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    This is the first part of two part series about the Immortal Six Hundred. The second part appears in Volume 50, Number 3. In 1864, the Confederate army held fifty Federal officers in a hotel in Charleston. In retaliation, fifty Confederate officers were sent to be held in a pen outside Fort Wagner, where they would be under fire from the Confederate army. Major General Samuel Jones of the Confederate army and Federal General J.G. Foster exacted a trade of the fifty men on August 3, 1864. Six hundred more Yankee officers were sent to Charleston in order to do more trading. However, on August 21, 1864, General Grant sent a letter to General Foster instructing him against all future trades. At the same time 600 Confederate officers were selected from Fort Delaware to be placed in a two-acre pen in front of Morris Island, exposed to Confederate shellfire. Of these Confederates, 111 were from North Carolina. Housed in “A” tents in parallel rows, the captives drank water from holes dug in the ground between the tents and ate spoiled meat. In contrast, war records show that the Charleston authorities provided rations of rice, beans, and fresh meat to their Federal captives. General Foster reported that up to 389 Federal officers took the oath of allegiance to the Confederacy as a result of the exemplary treatment paid them while held captive.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 2, July 1982, p18-22, il, por, map  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8553
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  • 3. James K. Polk Slept Here by Williams, Robert L.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    In 1844 on his way to the Democratic National Convention, James K. Polk spent the night at Magnolia Grove, the mansion of David Smith located in southern Lincoln County. The first tavern of the area, Dellinger's Tavern, stood just behind Magnolia Grove and not more than a hundred yards from the mansion was a rock building that would become the first jailhouse and first courthouse in Lincoln County. The construction of the main house at Magnolia Grove is truly remarkable for its state of preservation. Some of the bricks still bear fingerprints from the original masons. Magnolia Grove has been in the Love family since 1972 and it was Ed and Elizabeth Love who took such care to restore the house. The furniture is not from the 1820s, but the rest of the house still has original woodwork and plaster. The basement, once used to chain slaves, has metal rings in the walls. The bedroom where Polk slept is perfectly preserved.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 2, July 1982, p12-13, 33, il  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8552
    Full Text:
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