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3 results for "The State" issue:Vol. 38 Issue 14, Dec 1970
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  • 1. North Carolina's Po' Boy Painter by Russell, Phillips
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    North Carolina artist and educator William G. Randall, originally from Piedmont Springs in Burke County, walked from his home to Chapel Hill in order to receive an education. Randall left a detailed account of his journey which was taken completely on foot except for a train ride from Winston to Greensboro. Leaving Burke County with three dollars and carrying his few clothes in a valise, Randall arrived in Chapel Hill to begin his education with only thirty cents in his pocket. While at the university, Randall began to earn extra money as a portrait artist, and after graduating in 1884 he got his first job as a teacher in Marion, NC. With encouragement from his wife, Randall left teaching to study art in New York, eventually opening a gallery in Raleigh and painting portraits that have hung in Raleigh at the State Library, the Supreme Court chamber, and at the state universities in Greensboro and Chapel Hill.
    Source:
    The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 14, Dec 1970, p13-14, 28, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    10633
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  • 2. Pender Museum by Mincher, Ruth
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    In 1968, an Edgecombe County farmhouse was moved from its former location between Conetoe and Old Sparta to its present site on Saint Andrew Street in Tarboro as the first step in the long-range museum project of the Edgecombe County Historical Society. The home, believed to be built in 1810, was moved and restored with funding from a generous bequest by the late Katherine Pender, donations from members and friends of the Edgecombe County Historical Society, and a substantial grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The list of acquisitions for the museum continues to grow and currently includes a Holmes Cotton Gin, patented in 1793 by Hodgson Holmes of Augusta, GA, and a hand-woven bedspread made in 1819 by Polly Ann Stancil of Old Sparta. The Pender Museum was dedicated on October 15, 1969. Mrs. Robert W. Scott, North Carolina's First Lady, gave the dedication speech. Governor Scott attended and also spoke.
    Source:
    Record #:
    10635
    Full Text:
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