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16 results for "Our State" issue:Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006
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  • 5. Waterlogged by Hairr, John
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    By the late 1880s and early 1900s, accessible forests in the state's eastern sections had been cleared by loggers. Much of the remaining virgin forests lay in the remote, rugged western counties. Transporting this timber to market was neither safe nor economical. To overcome this problem, flumes were developed. A flume is a wooden trough, built in a V-shaped manner and filled with water, by which the logs could be transported safely and efficiently. They resembled train trestles and could reach heights of forty feet. In 1907, the Giant Lumber Company constructed the longest flume ever built in North Carolina. It reached nineteen miles across Wilkes County from the company lumberyard into the vast timber properties. In June 1916, a catastrophic flood, produced by a hurricane, washed the flume out in several places. The flume was never rebuilt.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p124-126, 128-129, il  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8122
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  • 7. The State Dog by Pittard, Janet C.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The story of the Plott hound begins in 1750 when Johannes Plott emigrated to colonial America from Heidelberg, Germany. He brought with him two Hanoverian-type Schweisshunds (bloodhounds). Plott eventually settled in New Bern, married, had three sons, and then moved on to Cabarrus County. His descendants continued to live in the Smoky Mountains and breed the dogs. The Plott hound is an intelligent animal, has a formidable reputation as a hunter, and tends to be a one-person dog. In 1946, the dog was recognized by the United Kennel Club, and years later by the American Kennel Club. On August 12, 1989, the North Carolina General Assembly officially recognized the Plott hound as the State Dog. At the time, few North Carolinians had ever heard of the hound, much less seen one.
    Source:
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8120
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