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14 results for "Our State" issue:Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006
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  • 1. Kannapolis by Hodge, Alan
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The history of Kannapolis in Cabarrus County during the 20th-century is closely tied to the Cannon Manufacturing Company. James William Cannon started construction of his mill in 1906. At his death in 1921, 12 plants in the Kannapolis complex employed 15,000 workers, who were producing over 300,000 towels a day. The mills employed several generations of mill workers. In 1985, the plants were sold, and after passing through several owners, closed permanently in 2003. Nearly 4,800 workers in Cabarrus and Rowan counties were laid off. County leaders began a search for new projects. Since 2003, over 350 new jobs have come to Kannapolis, along with $25 million in new investments. The biggest project is the North Carolina Research Campus. This $1 billion biotechnology center, opening in 2010, will be one of the most advanced facilities of its type in the world.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p18-20, 22, 24-25, il, por, map  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    7991
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  • 2. Space Invader by Hairr, John
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    On April 21, 1913, a meteorite slammed into Moore County about three miles from the town of Carthage. It was not very big, weighing slightly over four pounds and measuring about the size of a large man's fist. George Calvin Graves, who owned the land where the meteorite landed, took it home, and there it remained for the next twenty-one years. In 1934, Harry T. Davis, curator of geology at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences came to see it and later took it to the Smithsonian Institution. Over the years scientists around the world have studied the “Moore County,” seeking to learn more about its origin and composition. Meteorites are named for places where they are found. Part of the Moore County meteorite is now in the Smithsonian Institution, and the remainder is in the NC Museum of Natural Sciences.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p27-29, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    7992
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  • 7. Return of the River Freighter by Gigley, Chris
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    On the Dan River in the 1800s, the bateau was the choice of residents for shipping and receiving goods. The bateau, a double-ended, flat-bottomed vessel with a wide hull, can measure up to 60 feet with a capacity for carrying 10,000 pounds of cargo. Propulsion is man-powered by a crew of three. One sits in the back and works the tiller, while the other two plunge long poles down to the river bottom, push their weight against them, and walk from one end of the bateau to the other. The first bateau appeared on the Dan in 1792. Three Rivers Outfitters of Eden has revived this relic of the 19th-century. The company's 40-foot replica takes passengers on a one-mile voyage from Eden Wildlife Access to Leaksville Landing. Gigley recounts his experiences on the voyage.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p174-176, 178, il  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8001
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  • 10. Local Rewards by Chase, Nan K.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Organic farming, or farming without chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, is a growing trend in North Carolina. With the decline of the tobacco economy, there is a movement toward producing a wide range of foods locally and organically. The Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock held its first Organic Growers School in 1994. Over the next few years one or two hundred people attended the one-day event. In 2006, the event drew 1,100 people from North Carolina and fourteen other states. The school featured fifty-six class sessions in fourteen tracks from soil science to marketing, nine half-day workshops, a full-day children's program, and three vendor talks.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 3, Aug 2006, p116-118, 120-121, il  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    7999
    Full Text:
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