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17 results for "Our State" issue:Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007
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  • 1. Tale of a Whale by Hairr, John
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    In 1913, an unidentified mammal washed up on Bird Shoal Island, located inside the entrance to Beaufort Inlet on the North Carolina coast. It was a whale that measured sixteen feet long and had a beak, but what kind of whale was it? Eventually the remains reached the Smithsonian Institution where Frederick W. True, the nation's foremost expert on marine mammals, realized the remains were from an undocumented species. Since he was first to describe the new species, he assigned its official Latin name--Mesoplodon mirus. The whale is commonly called True's beaked whale. In 1940, a pregnant beaked whale was found along the Outer Banks and examined by North Carolina's famed naturalist H. H. Brimley. It would be eighty years later, on May 29, 1993, before beaked whales were seen in the wild. Appropriately the sighting was off the Outer Banks, forty-five miles southeast of Hatteras Inlet. Since 1993, other sightings have been rare, and the creature remains one of the most elusive of the ocean's mammals.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8859
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  • 5. White Out by Jackson, L.A.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Brevard, in Transylvania County, is home to one of the few white squirrel populations in the country. The squirrels are not albinos. While a student at Brevard College, Bob Glesener founded the White Squirrel Research Institute. Now a Brevard associate professor of biology emeritus, he continues his study of the white squirrels. Glesener discusses the history of the Brevard population, which was accidentally introduced over fifty years ago. Since 2004, Brevard has celebrated an annual White Squirrel Festival, and the local White Squirrel Shoppe sells white squirrel products, including mugs, candles, and ornaments. The festival draws between 15,000 and 18,000 people.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p48-50, 52-53, il  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8855
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  • 12. Singing for Survival by Morris, Bill
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Many smaller towns along North Carolina's coast are falling victim to spreading development and increasing tax rates. With commercial fishing declining and a high market value on property, many working-class people choose to sell in hopes of getting some financial security. When this happens, the old traditions that have existed in towns for over one hundred years slowly slip away. Salter Path in Carteret County is one example. The town is poised on the edge of exploding prices, modern development, and inevitable irreversible change. Morris discusses the work of Fielding Darden, who produced a CD and book in 2006, titled WILL THIS TOWN SURVIVE, and his activities to preserve the town's history.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p156-160, 162, il  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8875
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