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17 results for "Our State" issue:Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007
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  • 3. An Educated Woman by Westbrook, Kathy Grant
     
    Abstract:
    Margaret Anna Robertson was born in 1810, and in 1831, she married the Rev. Robert Burwell. In 1835, the family moved to Hillsborough, where Rev. Burwell had accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian Church. There she was prompted by local townspeople to open a school. In 1837, the Burwell School opened, initially for local girls. However, Burwell's curriculum for girls was progressive for the times and offered courses such as penmanship, geography, astronomy, algebra, chemistry, and philosophy. The boarding school soon attracted students from as far away as New York, Alabama, and Florida. The Burwell School operated for twenty years. During that time Anna Burwell was quite busy, raising her twelve children, teaching, looking after students boarding in her home, and being the wife of the minister. In 1857, they moved to Charlotte, where Rev. Burwell became president of the Charlotte Female Institute, now Queens University of Charlotte. Anna Burwell died in 1871.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p92-94, 96, 98, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8686
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  • 7. Home Work by Silcox-Jarrett, Diane
     
    Abstract:
    Jane S. McKimmon was the first director of the North Carolina Home Demonstration Clubs and the state's first home demonstration agent. She began work in 1909, and her job took her to many rural areas across the state. Her goal was to help rural women and girls learn how to improve their homes and their lives. Placing home demonstration agents in counties to work with farm women was part of her duties. She began with fourteen county agents and 416 women. Under her direction, the home demonstration clubs grew to 75,000 members representing all one hundred North Carolina counties. Once a year McKimmon would bring the agents to Raleigh for in-service training. As attendance increased over the years, the group needed their own building. Club members donated $2.50 apiece over a four-year period and raised over $100,000 in 1951 to help finance the Jane S. McKimmon Center on the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh. McKimmon died in 1957, almost twenty years before the center opened in 1976.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p128-130, 132, 134, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8695
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  • 8. Healing Arts by Blackburn, Charles, Jr.
     
    Abstract:
    Ruth Faison Shaw was born in Kenansville in 1888. She was a visionary artist and educator who rediscovered the ancient art of finger painting and took it to new heights. Shaw first introduced finger painting to the country in the 1930s at the Dalton School in New York. Exhibitions of paintings by Shaw and her students received glowing reviews, and she published a book in 1934 explaining her ideas on the technique. The most important aspect of her work came when she recognized finger painting's potential in the treatment of mental illness. Finger painting is now widely used by psychiatrists as a method to approach severely disturbed patients. Shaw returned to North Carolina in the 1950s and was a consultant in art therapy in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill until her death.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p108-110, 112-113, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8688
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  • 13. Mountain Man by Baer, Katie
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    In 1904, Horace Kephart left his job as a librarian in St. Louis and his estranged wife and six children, settling in the mountain wilderness of North Carolina where he hoped to recover his spirit and rediscover his gifts. He first lived in the Hazel Creek area of Swain County and later moved to Bryson City, the county seat. Two of his books, CAMPING AND WOODCRAFT and OUR SOUTHERN HIGHLANDERS, are considered classics in their fields and are still in print one hundred years later. In his later years, he was active in promoting the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Mount Kephart was named for him in honor of his work for the park.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p164-166, 168-169, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    8714
    Full Text:
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