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15 results for "Our State" issue:Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006
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  • 1. Valdese by Teague, Beth
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Valdese, Burke County's second largest town, was founded by the Waldensians, a pre-Reformation Christian sect from the Cottain Alps of Italy. Members of the group emigrated to Burke County in May 1893, searching for freedom and room to grow. Residents of the town work very hard to preserve this history. Every year their story is retold in the outdoor drama “From This Day Forward,” the nation's fourth oldest outdoor drama. The Trail of Faith, an outdoor museum with fifteen exhibits, details the Waldensians' centuries of struggle in Europe and recreates their historic journey to North Carolina. Other activities the town offers include visits to the Old Rock School, the Waldensian Heritage Wines, and Myra's, and playing a game of bocce.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p18-20, 22-23, il, map  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    7597
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  • 2. Hail to the Chief by Stewart, Al
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    James K. Polk, eleventh president of the United States, was born in Mecklenburg County on November 2, 1795. Polk's life and career was divided between North Carolina and Tennessee. He was graduated from the University of North Carolina but lived thereafter in Tennessee. He served in Congress for fourteen years and became Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1835. Later he ran for president in 1844, campaigning on a pledge to serve just one term. As president, Polk championed the cause of westward expansion of the United States, settled the Oregon boundary dispute with England, and gained Congressional recognition of a state of war with Mexico and the annexation of Texas.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p25-27, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    7599
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  • 5. Two-Wheelers by Blackburn, Charles, Jr.
     
    Abstract:
    Mary Meletiou learned to ride a bicycle on the quiet streets of Burlington in the 1950s. Later she would go on a 2,000 mile bicycle ride from Greensboro to Denver. In 1974, she went to Raleigh to promote bicycle touring in North Carolina. There were no bicycle routes at that time. Meletiou, an economic major at UNC-G, had also studied cartography. She developed the state's first bike trail, the 700-mile Mountains to the Sea Trail. Today the state's extensive Bicycling Highways System consists of nine trails, including the Ports of Call, the North Line Trace, and the Cape Fear Run. North Carolina's bicycle trails program has received national attention and served as a model for other states, including Colorado and Tennessee.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p96-98, 100, 102-103, il, map  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    7607
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  • 14. Scissors Kick by Kopp, Katherine
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    For the past twenty-two years, Dottie Netherton of Edenton has been practicing scherenschnitte, or the art of cutting an image into paper, generally cutting away the background and leaving the shape of the paper to form the desired image. The art, which dates back 1,000 year to China, evolved in Europe, and came to America in the 1700s. The craft was popular in North Carolina's early colonial towns. Netherton originally cut from patterns, but as her skill progressed, she made her own designs, incorporating traditional elements, such as hearts, flowers, birds, and Biblical themes. Her work is sold in about twenty stores from Pennsylvania to Kentucky and beyond.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p130-132, 134,, il  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    7611
    Full Text:
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