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18 results for "Our State" issue:Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005
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  • 1. Swamp Thing by Adams, Kevin
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The bald cypress tree, while not a true cypress, has played a part in North Carolina history for over 4,500 years. The tree grows in wet, swampy areas, often in standing water. At Phelps Lake in Washington County 30 dugout canoes made of bald cypress by Native Americans were found; the oldest canoe dates back to around 2430 B.C. The bald cypress was popular with colonists, who used it in ship building, fence making, and other types of construction. The greatest use of the tree was in making house shingles. At the start of the Civil War, a company, founded in the Dismal Swamp by George Washington, was shipping a million and a half shingles a year. Logging felled most of the state's old-growth bald cypress trees during the 19th- and early 20th-centuries, though some remain in out-of-the-way swamps. One tree in Three Sisters Swamp in Pender County is 1,600 years old, making it the oldest documented living thing in the eastern United States.
    Source:
    Record #:
    7453
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  • 2. Marion by Teague, Beth
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Marion, county seat of McDowell County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town is located near major highways, which allows residents to enjoy the charm of a small town and still have easy access to the amenities of larger towns like Asheville and Hickory. Preservation is important in the downtown area with a number of buildings refurbished for modern-day uses. Marion is home to several structures on the National Register of Historic Places, including the McDowell County Courthouse. For the past nineteen years the Appalachian Potters Market, which brings sixty artisans from the Southeastern United States, has been a major tourist draw.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p18-20, 22, il  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    7450
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  • 5. Sitting Pretty by Farlow, Shannon
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Starting in 1926, W. C. Page, Sr., and Arthur Presnell manufactured rocking chairs in Asheboro. The P&P Chair Company still occupies the original factory buildings. Presnell sold his share to his partner in the 1930s. The company experienced economic up-and-downs, and in the 1950s, the owners contemplated closing. Dr. Janet Travell, a back specialist, liked the chair and ordered several for her waiting room. When she placed her order, she asked for the Carolina Rocker, and the name stuck. One of her patients, a U.S. Senator, sat in one, and just had to have one for his office. When the senator moved to the White House in January 1961, the rocker went with him. The Carolina Rocker quickly became the Kennedy Rocker, and company sales took off.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p44-48, il, por  (Periodical website)
    Record #:
    7463
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  • 9. Train, Train by Reevy, Tony
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Reevy recounts the history of one of the shortest rail lines in the country. The short-run Carrboro Branch line between Chapel Hill and Carrboro has served its unique purpose for more than a century. Incorporated in 1873 as the Chapel Hill Iron Mountain Railroad Company, the ten-mile railroad was to serve an iron mine. Construction of the road began in 1879, but the company soon ran out of money. The mine was never a success, and ownership passed through several large railroad companies. Today, the line carries coal to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Cogeneration Facility three times a week as well as other freight for the area. About the mid-20th-century, Carrboro native and folksinger, Elizabeth “Libba” Cotton wrote a famous song, called “Freight Train,” about the Carrboro train as she knew it.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p148-150, 152-153, il  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    7471
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