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  • 3. How the Movies Started in N.C. by Arthur, Billy
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    North Carolina has long been a pioneer in the movie industry. The state was the site of the first all-cartoon show, the first double feature, and showed the first “talkies” in the South. Charlotte served as a movie distribution center during the 1920s and was considered a “second Hollywood.” The first movies seen by North Carolinians were shown by George Bailey and Fox Howard in 1906. The two men showed a movie in New Bern's Masonic Theatre. The movie was a success and the men took their movie to Wilmington's Bijou Theatre on December 24, 1906. The Bijou was the state's first theatre built exclusively to show movie pictures. In 1921, North Carolina produced a film on the Lost Colony which was shown all over the state. It was America's first educational film. Today, the movie industry is still thriving in North Carolina. In 1980 the N.C. Commerce Department created the N.C. Film Office, who predicts that the film industry will boost the state's economy $75 million to $100 million annually.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8815
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  • 7. The Sea Breeze Theatre by Paul, Grayden
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Davis, North Carolina, was home to the first movie theater in Carteret County. Beaufort soon followed the trend and in 1911 opened the Sea Breeze Theatre. A family business, the Sea Breeze was operated by William Luther Paul and his children. Projected by hand, films were shown at the theatre once per week. As they were silent, subtitles were included. To aid in the movie going experience, Paul designed a number of sound effects which could be operated in the projection booth including train whistles, horses running, and horns playing. When sound was finally incorporated into movies, a Victrola would play the associated record as the movie ran. By 1916, movies had expanded to include serial films with episodes playing over a number of weeks. Paul continued to experiment with sound and by 1928 had a working model of a Vitaphone system. The theatre operated through World War II.
    Source:
    The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p8-11, il
    Record #:
    34734
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