Access to articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


17 results for Roads--History
< PREV PAGE OF 2 NEXT >



  • 4. Let's Retrace the Great Wagon Road by James, Hunter
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road served as a main north-–south thoroughfare in Colonial America. Prior to English settlement, Iroquois tribes used the road as a trading route. A portion of the Wagon Road can still be found on William H. McGee's farm in Stokes County. As Stokes County Historical Council president, McGee is directing a project to retrace the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road through North Carolina. This project is sponsored by the North Carolina Quadricentennial Anniversary Committee. Along with other projects, such as the building of the Elizabeth II and the excavation of the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island, the North Carolina Quadricentennial Anniversary Committee is attempting to call attention to the first English settlements in America.
    Source:
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    8074
    Full Text:
    Print View
  • 5. You Had to Fit the Ruts by Fountain, Alvin M.
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Before the automobile, wagons were the prime mode of local transportation. Wagons built in eastern North Carolina differed from those built in western North Carolina in the width of their track. Owing to the rough terrain, western buggies had a width of only fifty-four inches; those in the east had a width of sixty inches. Buggies that went on roads outside of their region experienced rough rides. This was rarely a problem, however, as few North Carolinians took their buggies far away from home. The automobile changed things. The first mass-produced cars, such as the Ford Model-T, came with a sixty-inch tread option, but by 1916, all cars were manufactured with a fifty-four-inch tread. This caused a lot of damage to roads in eastern North Carolina until the paving campaigns of the 1920s and 1940s.
    Source:
    Record #:
    8476
    Full Text:
    Print View
  • 12. The Good Roads State by Mims, Bryan
     
    Author(s):
    Abstract:
    Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. At that time the state was not involved. It was left to the counties, and the counties did not work together. Therefore, crossing county lines would often provide a different type of road for drivers. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Governors Locke Craig and Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
    Source:
    Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p42-44, 46, 48-49, il, map  (Periodical website)
    Subject(s):
    Record #:
    22138
    Print View

< PREV PAGE OF 2 NEXT >