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The story of the Duplin County Agricultural Society : organized April 23, 1854

Date: 1958 | Identifier: HD1485.D86 S76 1958
The story of the Duplin County Agricultural Society : organized April 23, 1854. Wallace, N.C. : Wallace Enterprise, [1958] 59 p. : ports. ; 22 cm. Transcribed and printed from the original manuscript, which has many faded and missing pages, as near as humanly possible, April, 1958, by The Wallace Enterprise ... Without the efforts put forth by Miss Macy Cox of Magnolia, this book may have never been published.--P. 3. more...
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THE STORY OF
The
Duplin County
Agricultural
Society
Organized April 23, 1854









THE STORY OF
The
Duplin County
Agricultural
Society



Organized April 23, 1854
Transcribed and printed from the original manuscript, which has many faded and missing pages, as near as humanly possible, April, 1958, by The Wallace Enterprise, H. L. Oswald, owner, Wallace, North Carolina.




Dedicated To The People and Future Generations of Duplin County

PRINTED BY THE WALLACE ENTERPRISE PUBLISHERS

Wallace, North Carolina

First Printing 4-58—(500)—(1805)





MISS MACY COX

Without the efforts put forth by Miss Macy Cox of Magnolia, this book may have never been published. It is she who has worked to preserve it for the future generations of this county and it is she who deserves the credit for its publication.

Miss Cox, 84-year-old Magnolia civic and religious leader, has always manifested a great deal of interest in the history of this section. She found the original manuscript of the records of the organization and the early years of the Duplin County Agricultural Society some years ago among the many books in her possession. The manuscript includes a wealth of old Duplin family names and Miss Cox has worked long and hard to have this book published so that all Duplinites and others interested in the history of this section may have access to it.

The book is rich in historical data, with the minutes of the organizational meeting held on April 23, 1854, names of the various officers through the years, and interesting facts on the County Fairs sponsored by the Society and names of those winning prizes included in the information.

Although an occasional page is missing from the original manuscript, a good picture of the fairs and the life of this section of that time is given. From all indications, the Society was inactive from early 1861 until 1865, when a re-organizational meeting was held. This was probably caused by the War Between the States, as the last item in the book, recorded by D. Mallard, Recording Secretary, states: “The Society then discussed at some length the ‘changed condition of society’ in our midst; when it was recommended that ‘no land’ be rented to negroes; but that they be hired at good wages and paid promptly, also that contracts with negroes be written.”





When the Duplin County Agricultural Society was finally disbanded permanently, or whether or not any more fairs were held after the re-organization meeting on October 29, 1865 (although in the last pages of this book, it will be noted that a future meeting was planned for the first Saturday in January, 1866), it is not known. There were a number of pages torn from the back of the manuscript in Miss Cox's possession and these possibly contained this information.

“How I came to be in possession of this book is almost a miracle,” Miss Macy has stated.

She explained that the “great old Dr. Needham Herring” of Kenansville was a medical doctor and a Presbyterian preacher and the owner of a huge bookcase, with stacks and stacks of books, medical and denominational. When he died, the bookcase and contents were given to his son, John Shine Herring, who was deputy sheriff of Duplin County for many years. After Deputy Sheriff Herring's death, it was given to his daughter, Minnie Lee Herring, and after Minnie Lee's mother, Mrs. Dora Cox Herring, died, (Mrs. Dora Cox Herring was Miss Macy Cox's sister) Minnie Lea had the bookcase and books moved to Magnolia where she burned many of them and gave the remainder, along with the bookcase, to her aunt, Miss Macy Cox. Even after many were destroyed, there were a number of the old volumes left in the bookcase and are still in Miss Cox's possession.

“When I was searching for something in the bookcase about two years ago, I found the old ledger in which the history of the first Duplin Agricultural Society was recorded in beautiful script in the old-style of writing,” the Magnolia woman disclosed.

Through beautiful penmanship, the writing is very difficult to read. However, the printers have tried to faithfully reproduce each word as it originally appeared. Because of the difficulty in trying to decipher the names, however, it is quite possible that some are incorrect. Also, great difficulty was experienced in trying to decipher the various breeds of swine and other animals and items for which premiums were awarded at the fair, as the terminology of that day in some cases does not coincide with ours of today.

An interesting side note is the fact that in every case in which a word containing double “s”, a single “p” was substituted. For example, the word “association” appeared as “apociation”. The correct spelling has been used in printing this book.

PROMINENT CITIZENS ENDORSE BOOK

The following citizens of Duplin County have indicated that they do heartily approve this book and will sponsor it by their influence:

O. P. Johnson, Superintendent of Duplin County Schools, Kenansville; F. W. McGowen, Duplin County Auditor, Kenansville; Vernon H. Reynolds, County Agent, Kenansville; Vivian Wells, Clerk of Court, Kenansville; Amos Brinson, druggist, Kenansville;

Bruce Wilson, minister, Magnolia; Charlie Thomas, school teacher, Magnolia; Richard Croom, druggist, Magnolia; L. M. Sanderson, merchant and farmer, Magnolia; Mrs. Maye Croom, wife of the late John Croom, Mayor of Magnolia; Miss Betty Horne, school teacher,





Magnolia; J. D. Everett, minister, Magnolia; Mrs. Allie Rogers, music teacher, Magnolia; E. G. Murray, merchant, Magnolia, and Mrs. Murray;

Mrs. N. B. Boney, Executive Secretary, Duplin Chapter, American Red Cross, Kenansville; Mrs. Christine Williams, Duplin Register of Deeds, Kenansville; Dr. C. F. Hawes, physician, Rose Hill; J. B. Stroud, County Commissioner, Kenansville; Dr. Corbett Quinn, physician, Magnolia; Preston Holmes, jeweler, Kenansville;

S. B. Hunter, flower grower, Magnolia; G. S. Best, undertaker, Warsaw; Mrs. Thelma Taylor, Superintendent Department of Public Welfare, Duplin County, Kenansville; Clarence Pope, school teacher, Magnolia; W. L. Bostic, farmer, Magnolia; J. W. Evans, farmer, Magnolia; Harry Culbreth, carpenter, Magnolia; Dennis Pope, carpenter, Magnolia;

Miss Dorothy Wightman, County Librarian, Kenansville; Emmett Sasser, salesman, Magnolia; John Bradshaw, merchant, Magnolia; David Barnette, barber, Magnolia; Mrs. Alta Kornegay, Home Agent, Kenansville; Mrs. Alvin Powell, housewife, Magnolia; Rev. Julian Motley, minister, Rose Hill; Tracy Brown, farmer, Magnolia;

Mrs. Albert Askew, housewife, Warsaw; Leon Brown, farmer, Chinquapin; Lott Kornegay, farmer, Warsaw; Mrs. L. E. Pope, merchant, Magnolia; J. W. Hoffler, County Commissioner, Wallace; E. E. Kelly, County Commissioner, Albertson; Heman Hall, timberman, Rose Hill; Miss Nell Bowden, teacher, Warsaw.

There are also many other citizens in the county who have endorsed this book.

ORGANIZATION

A portion of the citizens of Duplin County, North Carolina taking into consideration the imperfect system of culture and other agricultural and domestic pursuits in this county, have assembled at the courthouse in the town of Kenansville on the 23rd day of April, A. D. 1854, and after consulation and reflection conclude to associate together for the purpose of improvement within our borders and which association shall be known as the Duplin Agricultural Society and for the proper regulations of the said Society, we adopt the following as our Constitution.

CONSTITUTION

Article 1 — Resolved that our association shall be known and styled as the Duplin Agricultural Society and that every respectable citizen shall be allowed to participate with us who shall comply with the By-Laws and regulations of this society.

Article 2 — Resolved to have a president, two vice presidents, one corresponding and one secondary secretary and a treasurer who shall be elected annually by ballot as the officers of this society and in all meetings of the society the president (when present) shall preside unless he requests one of the vice presidents to do so who shall discharge the duties of the chair and to the president or the vice presidents all complaints shall be made against the society or any





of its members.

Article 3 — Resolved to hold quarterly meetings of the society at the courthouse in Kenansville on the first Saturday of every County Court Month and more often if deemed advisable for the transaction of any business. Any twelve members of the society shall constitute a quorum for said purpose.

Resolved that the following By-Laws shall form a part of the above Constitution and shall be observed by the members of the society.

BY - LAWS

Every member (except females hereafter mentioned) shall subscribe and pay over to the treasurer the sum of one dollar to entitle him to membership and shall also contribute annually the sum of one dollar to defray the expenses of the society.

Resolved that all widows, unmarried ladies (who have no father society held at such time and place as shall be agreed upon in meet-contribution.

Resolved that there shall be annual exhibition at Fairs of this society held at such time and place as shall be agreed upon in meeting and such exhibitions shall be conducted according to directions of the officers of the society.

Resolved that whenever another change is proposed in the foregoing Constitution or By-Laws notice shall be given in meeting of said proposed change three months previous to the making of said alternation.

ELECTION OF OFFICERS

After the above Constitution and By-Laws were adopted, the society proceeded to the election of officers for the year 1854. Jeremiah Pearsall was elected president, Owen R. Kenan and James Dickson vice presidents, Stephen M. Grady corresponding and Issac B. Kelly secondary secretary and D. Needham W. Herring, treasurer.

ROLL OF MEMBERS

The following are the names of the members of the society which is copied as they were signed to the paper that started by Jeremiah Pearsall on the 17th of October, 1853:

Isaac B. Kelly, Jesse Swinson, John Bennette, Harper Williams, Unoh Herring, James G. Stokes, Owen R. Kenan, David Southerland, John I. McGowen, William W. Miller, Stephen M. Grady, Clarborne J. Oates, Alfred Houston, Holsted Bowden, William J. Kornegay, John B. Hupy, David Williams, Curtis C. Oates, John C. Mallard, James Pearsall, Henry C. Kornegay, N. W. Herring, George W. Middleton, James Dickson.





William B. Middleton, C. McMillan, Bryan W. Herring, Lebb Middleton, John A. Bryan, Jere Pearsall, David J. Southerland, Gibson Carr, William B. Southerland, David Reid, Grady Outlaw, James B. Curt, John W. Gilliespie, James R. Hurst, Edward Pearsall, Robert J. Pearsall, Stokes Wells, Henry E. Rhodes, George L. Best, E. J. Middleton, Thomas Hall, Briant Smith, Jr., Joseph W. James, James E. Ward, James Hall, James G. Branch, Howell Best, John W. Boney, John J. Whitehead, James H. Jerman.

James M. Grady, Hugh Maxwell, Robert D. Sloan, N. B. Whitfield, C. J. Houston, John D. Abernathy, Jesse P. Jordan, Henry H. Hodges, Stephen Herring, Benj. F. Cobb, Edward W. Houston, I. J. Sprunt, Thos. J. Carr, J. T. R. Miller, Almon Holmes, Henry James, Osborne Carr, Alesie A. Grady, Major J. Taylor, Stephen M. Henry, Dickson Mallard, A. G. Mosely, John D. Carroll, William D. Pearsall, Joel Lofton, William W. Farrior, Blaney Williams, Stephen Graham, William R. Ward, John M. Chartin.

Boney Wells, Jr., Henry R. Kornegay, William L. Johnson, James Alderman, William Farrior, D. C. Moore, John Smith, Thomas Hill, Francis Williams, William E. Hill, Alfred Hollingsworth; Isaac W. West, J. D. Carr, John Dobson, A. T. Stanford, C. W. Graham, Alsa Southerland, Patrick Merritt, William J. Houston, Albert R. Hicks, David F. Chambers, John Carr, James W. Blount, Isaac Brown.

MEETING — JULY 1854

At a regular meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held at the courthouse in Kenansville in July 1854 the following was adopted as a part of the Constitution and By-Laws of the society.

Resolved that it shall be the duty of the recording secretary to keep a book in which he shall record the Constitution and By-Laws of the society and that at each meeting he shall record the proceedings thereof in said book which shall be read and approved at the same time by the society.

Resolved that the treasurer shall receive the funds belonging to the society, keep a record of the same, disburse them according to the discretion of the society and make a report in detail annually at first meeting after the first day of January in each and every year.

At the same time Jeremiah Pearsall, the president of the society, proposed that they hold a fair in Kenansville on the 7th of October next and that a committee be appointed to make out and publish a list of premiums for the same which was unanimously adopted.

Alsa Southerland and Isaac B. Kelly were appointed to make arrangements for holding said fair.

On motion of John A. Bryan the meeting adjourned.

FIRST ANNUAL DUPLIN FAIR — OCTOBER, 1854

At the first annual fair held by the Duplin Agricultural Society in October, 1854, at Kenansville, North Carolina the society, not having furnished themselves with grounds had to make use of the courthouse as a Floral and Farming Hall and the grove in front of the Baptist Church for the exhibition of stock etc. The articles and stock were much larger and better on exhibition than was expected. There was quite a large turn out by both males and females.





Premiums

The following is a list of the premiums at the time:

Bedquilts — Misses Ann J. Pearsall, P. Williams, Dolly Chambers and Mrs. R. J. Pearsall were considered equal and the committee awarded to each $2.00. Second best — Misses B. Mallard and J. Carr considered equal. Each $1.00.

Counterpanes — Miss Sarah F. Oliver and Mrs. Stephen were considered equal. Each received $1.00.

Best domestic cloth — Mrs. Dorothy Moore, $2.00.

Best embroidery — Misses R. J. Middleton and M. Monk, $1.00 each.

Best needle work — Miss R. J. Middleton, $1.00.

Best ornamental work — Miss Clara Wilcox, $1.00.

Best country-made soap — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly, $1.00.

Best sow and pigs — James Williams, $2.00.

Best hog — Daniel C. Moore, $1.00.

Best pair of pigs — Jeremiah Pearsall, $2.00. Second best pair of pigs — George W. Middleton, $1.00.

Best yoke oxen and bull — James Williams, $1.00.

Best milk cow — Isaac B. Kelly, $2.00. Second best milk cow — John J. Whitehead, $1.00.

Best bull calf — Daniel C. Moore, $2.00. Second best bull calf — Daniel C. Moore, $1.00.

Best natured horse — Stephen Herring, $2.00.

Best pair of horses — Isaac B. Kelly, $2.00.

Best acre of upland corn — Jeremiah Pearsall — $5.00. Second

Best acre of upland corn — Jeremiah Pearsall, $5.00. Second

Best acre of lowland corn — James Williams, $5.00. Second best acre of lowland corn — Jeremiah Pearsall, $2.00.

Best bacon ham — Jeremiah Pearsall, $1.00.

Best pair of chickens — John A. Bryan, $1.00.

Best country-made plough — John Forlaw, $3.00.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1854

A meeting of the society took place on the afternoon of the day of the fair in the Grand Jury room in the courthouse with Jeremiah Pearsall in the chair. On motion the society proceeded to the election of officers for the coming year. Jeremiah Pearsall was elected president, Owen R. Kenan and James Dickson were elected vice presidents, Stephen M. Grady and Isaac B. Kelly, secretaries and Needham W. Herring, treasurer.

At this meeting of the society Graham Peterson and Daniel T. Boney became members thereof.

MEETINGS — 1855

Regular meetings of the society were held in the courthouse in Kenansville during the year 1855. Then the subject of farming was discussed among the members generally.





SECOND ANNUAL DUPLIN FAIR — OCTOBER, 1855

On Friday the 8th day of October, A.D. 1855, the second annual fair of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at the courthouse in the town of Kenansville and the result was of the most gratifying character. The assembly of visitors was very large and respectable. The stocks of cattle, horses, hogs, and chickens did credit to the person exhibiting them and would compare favorably with any exhibition of stock at the State Fair heretofore held. The articles furnished by the ladies were arranged in the courthouse and did great credit to them. At one o'clock a very good agricultural address was delivered by William E. Hill, Esquire. Immediately afterward the reports of the different committees were read out by Jeremiah Pearsall, Esquire, the president of the society, which were as follows viz.

Premiums

Best acre of upland corn, 56¼ bushels — Harper Williams — $10.00. Second best acre of upland corn, 54¾ bushels — Isaac B. Kelly — $5.00.

Best acre of improved lowland corn, 70 bushels — James Williams — $10.00. Second best acre of improved lowland corn, 69¼ bushels—James Williams — $5.00. Third best acre of improved lowland corn—Jeremiah Pearsall — Diploma.

Best acre of wheat, 17¼ bushels — $4.00. Second best acre of wheat 15½ bushels — Isaac B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best acre oats, 2,000 lbs. — Isaac B. Kelly — $3.00.

Best stallion — Isaac Brown, $5.00.

Best brood mare — A. D. McGowen — $3.00.

Best two-year-old colt — Stephen Herring — $300. Second best two-year-old colt — D. F. Jones — $2.00. Third best two-year-old colt—William A. Faison — Diploma .

Best pair of carriage horses — Jere Pearsall — $5.00. Second best carriage horses — William E. Hill — Diploma.

Best pair drought horses — Isaac B. Kelly — $2.00.

Best saddle horse — Harper Williams — $2.00. Second best saddle horse — Thomas H. Kenan — Diploma.

Best bull — William A. Faison — $3.00.

Best three-year-old bull — Harper Williams — $2.00.

Best two-year-old bull — Abner Faison — $2.00.

Best calf — William A. Faison — $2.00. Second best calf — William A. Faison — Diploma.

Best heifer calf — James Williams — $2.00. Second best heifer calf — James Williams — Diploma.

Best heifer calf over one year old — William A. Faison — $2.00.

Best two-year-old heifer calf to Abner Faison — $2.00.

Best yoke oxen to J. J. McGowen $5.00. Second best oxen — James Williams — $3.00.

Best native milk cow — James Williams — $3.00.

Best devon milk cow — William A. Faison — $3.00.





Best lot of hogs — Isaac B. Kelly — $5.00.

Best boar — William B. Middleton — $2.50. Second best boar — James Williams — $1.00.

Best sow and pigs — Isaac B. Kelly — $3.00.

Best sow and shoats — J. B. Hussey — $3.00.

Best pair pigs — Ben R. Cooper — $3.00. Second best pair pigs — George L. Best — $2.00. Third best pigs — Ben R. Cooper — Diploma.

Best pen male pigs — Lemuel Hodges — Diploma.

Best bacon hams — Jere Pearsall — $2.00. Second best bacon hams — Jere Pearsall — $1.00. Third best bacon hams — Jere Pearsall — Diploma.

Best pair geese — George L. Best — $1.00.

Best pen turkeys — William M. Middleton — $2.00. Second best pen turkeys — Isaac B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best pair Asarotic chickens — I. Dickson Stanford and I. Dickson Pearsall — $2.50. Second best pair Asarotic chickens — John A. Bryant and William A. Faison — $1.00. Third best pair Asarotic chickens — John A. Bryant — $1.00.

Best grey game chickens — William A. Faison — $1.00.

Best pair spangled Bramah — William A. Faison — Diploma.

Best English Red Cap chickens — William A. Faison — Diploma.

Best native chickens — Ben R. Cooper — $1.00. Second best native chickens — R. J. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best fancy bantam chickens — R. J. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best domestic wheat bread — Mrs. John C. Mallard — $1.00.

Best dish butter — Mrs. Ann Oliver — $1.00.

Best jar preserves — Mrs. Ann Oliver — $1.00. Second best jar preserves — Mrs. Mary Ann Miller — Diploma.

Best marmalade — Mrs. A. Faison — Diploma.

Best jar jelly — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best preserved peaches — Mrs. M. A. Miller — $1.00.

Second best sweet pickles — Mrs. James D. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best lot of apples — Mrs. John C. Mallard — $1.00. Second best lot of apples — George L. Best — Diploma.

Best lot of peaches — James Williams — $1.00.

Best domestic soap — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly — $2.00. Second best soap — Ann Oliver — Diploma.

Best tallow candles — Ann Oliver — Diploma.

Best and largest selection of flowers; very fine — Rev. James M. Sprunt — $2.50.

Best bed quilt — Miss Susan Pearsall — $3.00. Second best quilt — Mrs. John Mallard — $2.00. Third best quilt — Mrs. J. E. Hall — $1.00. Fourth best quilt — Mrs. James Williams — Diploma. Fifth best quilt — Mrs. William E. Hill — Diploma. Sixth best quilt — Miss Dolly Chambers — Diploma.

Best counterpane — Mrs. William B. Middleton — $2.00. Second best counterpane —Mrs. James Williams — $1.00. Third best counterpane — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — Diploma. Fourth best counterpane — Mrs. Stephen Herring — Diploma.





Best woolen counterpane — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00.

Best specimen embroidery — Mrs. J. R. Faison — $2.00. Second best embroidery — Miss Rachel Middleton — $1.00.

Best needle work — Mrs. J. R. Faison — $2.00. Second best needle work — Miss Rachel Middleton — $1.00.

Best piece domestic cloth — Mrs. George L. Best — $3.00. Second best domestic cloth — Mrs. Wright Boney — $2.00. Third best cloth — Mrs. M. Frederick — Diploma.

Best made shirt and very fine pair of socks — Miss Martendale — $2.00.

Best made ox yoke — James Williams — $1.00.

Gate Hinges and latch — Siler Clute — $2.00.

Mrs. James E. Hall and Mrs. A. T. Stanford exhibited two ottomans of very tasty and neat workmanship; Miss Rachel Middleton a very handsome work box; Mrs. Best, some very handsome mullon curtains; Mr. Isaac B. Kelly some very handsome lard; and Mr. William B. Middleton a very fine sample of corn meal. Robert J. Furlow some very fine specimen of seed corn; William A. Faison some fine seed wheat; Dr. James H. Hicks, extra early seed peas; Owen R. Kenan a lot of fescue grass seed; Mrs. David Reid some very fine millet; Joseph Hatch some very fine turnips. There were many other articles on exhibition by various persons.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1855

At three o'clock in the afternoon the society met in the Grand Jury Room in the courthouse. James Dickson was requested to act as chairman. The society proceeded to the election of officers for the coming year by ballot. Then Jeremiah Pearsall was elected president, Own R. Kenan and James Williams were elected vice presidents, Needham W. Herring was elected treasurer and Stephen M. Grady and Isaac B. Kelly secretaries.

On motion it was ordered that the president appoint ten delegates to attend the State Fair at Raleigh.

Henry C. Kornegay, John I. McGowan, David J. Southerland, Claiborne F. Pearsall, Isaac B. Kelly, Benjamin Oliver, Hatsted Bowden and Robert J. Furlaw were appointed. On motion it was ordered that the president be added to the list.

Hasted Bowden, Chancey W. Graham, and John J. Whitehead were appointed a committee to procure a suitable lot in or near the town of Kenansville for the purpose of erecting Fair Grounds to hold the next annual fair on.





MEETING — JANUARY, 1856

At a meeting of the society held in the courthouse in the town of Kenansville in January, 1856, the committee appointed at the last meeting of the society to procure a lot for Fair Grounds and reported that they had not succeeded in procuring one and asked to be discharged from the duty which was granted.

On motion of Jeremiah Pearsall, William B. Middleton, Isaac B. Kelly and John J. Whitehead were appointed a committee to procure a suitable piece of ground for the use of the society for holding their fairs on, with the particular request that they do not neglect to perform the same and report to the next meeting of the society.

MEETING — APRIL, 1856

At a meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held in the courthouse in Kenansville in April, 1956, the president in the chair, Messers J. J. Whitehead, William B. Middleton and Isaac B. Kelly reported through their chairman, J. J. Whitehead, that William B. Middleton, Esquire, had very generously offered to make the society a deed for eight acres of land adjoining the Grove Academy without cost so long as the society should occupy it as a Fair Ground. The same committee was then appointed to procure lumber and have the necessary fences and buildings put up ready for the holding of the next fair. On motion the society adjourned after appointing a committee to prepare a list of premiums for the next fair.

MEETING — JULY, 1856

At a meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held in the courthouse in Kenansville in July, 1856, the president in the chair, the committee appointed at the last meeting to prepare a list of premiums for the next fair reported one which was adopted by the society with some small additions and alterations.

The committee appointed to inclose the fair grounds reported verbally that they would have everything in readiness for holding the next fair. The society then appointed the 6th and 7th of November for holding the same.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1856

There was quite a small meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held at Kenansville in October, 1856. The president in the chair, the subject of agriculture generally was discussed and the society adjourned.

THIRD ANNUAL DUPLIN FAIR — NOVEMBER, 1856

On Thursday and Friday the 6th and 7th days of November, 1856, the third annual fair was held by the Duplin Agricultural Society at their new Fair Grounds near Kenansville. The exhibition of articles of every kind was very good and much larger than heretofore. At 12 o'clock on Friday the president, Jeremiah Pearsall, Esquire, read from the stand the following list of premiums which had been awarded by the different committees.





Premiums

Best acre of upland corn — Jeremiah Pearsall, Esquire — 52 bushels — Premium. Next best — Isaac B. Kelly — Ditto.

Best acre of wheat — G. L. Best — 34 bushels — Ditto. Next best — Jeremiah Pearsall — Ditto.

Best acre sweet potatoes — Benjamni Oliver — 242 bushels — Premium.

Best acre cotton (not being all gathered) — W. A. Faison — Sampson 1877 lbs. — Premium.

Best bacon hams — Jeremiah Pearsall — Premium. Next best — Edward Pearsall — Premium.

Best and largest hog — William B. Middleton — Premium. Next best — John W. Gilliespie — Diploma.

Best sow and pigs — William B. Middleton — Premium.

Best pair pigs — Thomas H. Kennion — Premium. Next best — Bradock Williams — Diploma. Next best pair pigs — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Best lot Suffolk hogs — John W. Gilliespie — Premium.

Best hog over one year old — Stephen Herring — Premium. Next best — Stephen Herring — Premium.

Best boar — Stephen Herring — Premium. Next best — Isaac B. Kelly — Premium. Next best — B. R. Cooper — Diploma. Next best — Master Thomas Graham — Diploma.

Best lot of big hogs — Stephen Herring — Premium. Next best — John W. Gilliespie — Diploma.

Best lot fat shoats — William J. Houston — Premium.

Best bull improved stock — William A. Faison — Premium. Next best — Mrs. James Williams — Diploma.

Best milk cow — R. J. Pearsall — Premium. Second best — Ransom Middleton — Diploma. Third best — A. D. McGowan — Diploma.

Best bull yearling — F. J. Faison — Premium. Second best — F. J. Faison — Diploma.

Best heifer — Mrs. James Williams — Premium. Second best — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Best yoke oxen — A. D. McGowan — Premium. Second best — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Best single ox — Henry J. Johnson — Premium. Second best — James Kinney — Diploma.

Best stallion — O. R. Kenan — Premium — Second best — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Best brood mare — George L. Best — Premium. Second best — William A. Faison — Diploma.

Best saddle horse — Harper Williams — Diploma. Second best — William B. Middleton — Diploma. Third best — Thomas H. Kennion — Diploma. Fourth best — John Barden — Diploma.

Best colt, 2 years old — A. D. McGowan — Premium. Second best — C. B. McGowan — Diploma.

Best jack — J. R. Hatch — Premium.

Best pair of mules — H. Bowden — Premium. Second best pair — H. Bowden — Premium.





Best improved chickens — Ann Oliver — Premium. Second best — H. J. Johnson — Premium. Third best — Master Thomas Graham — Diploma.

Best game chickens — J. R. Hatch — Diploma.

Best native chickens — Mrs. H. J. Johnson — Premium. Second best — B. Williams — Premium. Third best — Isaac Brown Jones — Diploma.

Best turkeys — Isaac Brown Jones — Premium. Second best — Isaac B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best pair of ducks — J. J. Whitehead — Premium.

Best Poland geese — William A. Faison — Premium.

Best China geese — William A. Faison — Diploma.

Best woolen counterpane — Mrs. D. Kornegay — Premium. Second best — Mrs. George L. Best — Premium. Third best — Mrs. H. J. Johnson — Premium.

Best cotton counterpane — Miss Boon — Premium. Second best — Mrs. George L. Best — Premium. Third best — Kate Herring — Premium.

Best embroidery — Mrs. David Jones — Premium. Second best — Mrs. Peter Albertson — Premium.

Best needle work — Miss Rachel Middleton — Premium. Second best — Mrs. David Jones — Premium.

Best hearth rug — Miss B. Mallard — Premium.

Best hair net cap — Mrs. Neil McMillan — Premium.

Best woolen shawl (spun knit and dyed) — Mrs. Neil McMillan — Premium.

Best reticule made of Tamarond seed — Mrs. David Jones — Premium.

Best home made plough — Hill Pitman — Premium. Second best — George S. Best — Premium.

Best buggy — Jonathan Chestnutt — Premium.

Best specimen peas — Mrs. J. D. Carroll — Premium.

Best specimen apples — Mrs. H. Bowden — Diploma.

Best corn bread — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly — Premium.

Best pound cake — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly — Premium.

Best citron preserves — Mrs. William E. Hill — Premium.

Best peach preserves — Mrs. Ann Oliver — Premium.

Best butter — Mrs. William E. Hill — Premium.

Best Lard — Mrs. Dolly Moore — Premium.

Best candles — Mrs. Susan Bryant — Premium.

Best soap — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly — Premium.

Best domestic vest patterns — Mrs. Dolly Moore — Premium.

Best homespun ladies dress — Mrs. Dolly Moore — Premium.

Best homemade pantaloons — Mrs. George L. Best — Premium.

Best domestic carpet — Mrs. D. K. Kornegay — Premium.

Best bed quilt — Miss Kate Oliver — Premium. Second best — Mrs. J. E. Hall — Premium. Third best — Mrs. Calvin Jernigan — Premium. Fourth best — Miss Hester Kornegay — Premium. Fifth





best — Mrs. D. J. Middleton — Diploma. Sixth best — Mrs. George A. McClammy — Diploma.

Best trotting in single harness (distance 1500 yards) — Jere P. Holly — Horse, Joe — in three minutes.

Best trotting same distance in double harness — D. Edward W. Ward (Onslow County) — in three minutes and forty-five seconds.

Best racking same distance — Jere P. Holly — Horse, Joe — in two minutes and forty-seven seconds.

Best sample seed wheat — William A. Faison — Diploma.

Best sample seed corn — Isaac B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best sample seed rye — Edward Pearsall — Diploma.

Best sample seed rice — Edward Pearsall — Diploma.

Best sample seed peas — J. H. Carr — Diploma.

Second best sample seed peas — H. J. Johnson — Diploma.

Best black field peas — N. W. Herring — Diploma.

Best sample potatoes — Jere Pearsall — Diploma.

Best sample Duplin flour — Jere Pearsall — Diploma.

Best sample potatoes and peas — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Best sample squash — Henry J. Johnson — Diploma.

Best sample turnips — James B. Carr — Diploma.

Best sample beets — Dr. J. H. Faison — Diploma.

Best sample peanuts — G. A. McClammy — Diploma.

Best sample watermelon — Robert Pridgin — Diploma.

Best sample pumpkin — James Kinny — Diploma.

Best sample leather — H. J. Johnson — Diploma.

Best sample beeswax — Edward Pearsall — Diploma.

Best sample saw and lumber — Carroll Dickson, Sr. — Diploma.

Best sample saw and oak lumber — Carroll Dickson, Sr.—Diploma.

Best chair (made with a pocket knife) — Master Christopher C. Boney — Diploma.





MEETING — NOVEMBER, 1856

After the reading of the list of premiums the president requested the society to assemble immediately in one of the rooms of the Grove Academy. The meeting was organized by the president taking the chair. Then John J. Whitehead offered the following resolution which as passed unanimously.

Resolved that the thanks of the Duplin Agricultural Society is hereby tendered to William B. Middleton, Esquire, for his liberality in making said society a donation of the land where they have erected their Fair Grounds.

Officers Elected

An election was then held by ballot for officers for the year 1857. Then Jeremiah Pearsall, Esquire, was elected president; James Dickson and Owen R. Kenan, vice presidents; Stephen M. Grady, corresponding secretary; Isaac B. Kelly, recording secretary; and Dr. Needham W. Herring, treasurer.

On motion of Halsted Bowden, Esquire, the society then adjourned until the regular meeting in January, 1857.

MEETING — JANUARY, 1857

A meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at the regular time in January, 1857. There was but a few members present. After some discussion on farming generally, the meeting adjourned.

A meeting was held by the society in April, 1857, which was thinly attended. It adjourned after a short time being spent by several of the members in discussing the subject of farming, raising, etc.

A committee was appointed to make out a premium list for the next fair consisting of John A. Bryan, John C. Mallard, William B. Middleton, John Q. McGowan and Benjamin Oliver.

MEETING — JULY, 1857

A meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held in the courthouse in the town of Kenansville at their regular time in July, 1857. William B. Middleton, Isaac B. Kelly and Needham W. Herring, Esquire, were appointed a committee to prepare and put in order the Fair Grounds for holding the next fair also to procure music for the occasion. They were to obtain door keepers and a person to keep watch. At the same time Owen R. Kenan, Needham W. Herring and Jere Pearsall were appointed a committee to procure someone to deliver an address at the next fair. At the same time the president was requested to make out a list of persons to act as judges to award premiums and to appoint suitable persons to act as marshal, etc.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1857

A meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at the regular time in the courthouse in Kenansville in October, 1857. Then the committee to procure an orator for the next fair reported that they had been in correspondence with William W. Holden, Esquire, of Raleigh and that he had consented to appear on the program at the next fair.





Premiums
(4th Annual Fair)

(2 pages left out here in original manuscript.)

. . . exhibited by B. K. Outlaw and Col. John J. Whitehead.

Best seed pear — Isaac B. Kelly and Spaight Hill.

Best scuppernong vine — John C. Mallard and Spaight Hill.

Fine fruits and seeds — Harper Williams and Mrs. Joseph W. Oalton.

Fine specimen of rye — D. K. Kornegay and E. Pearsall.

Best lot of bacon hams — Mrs. Morph Pearsall — $3.00. Second best — Mrs. Dolly Moore (2 years old) — $2.00. Third best — Osborne Carr, exhibited by James B. Monk — $1.00.

Very supreme bacon hams that could only be beat in Duplin County were also exhibited by Jere Pearsall, J. Q. McGowan, David J. Middleton, James E. Hall, William Farrior, Isaac B. Kelly and Harper Williams.

Best pickled pork — Osborne Carr, James B. Monk — $3.00. Second best — J. C. Mallard — $1.00. Third best — B. K. Outlaw and W. R. Ward — Diplomas.

A superior article of dried beef — William Herring — $1.00.

Best lot of lard — Edward Pearsall — $3.00. Second best lot — Isaac Brown Jones — $2.00. Third best lot — James E. Hall—Diploma.

Best butter — Margaret Pearsall — $3.00. Second best — Edward Pearsall — $3.00.

Butter of very superior quality was exhibited by Mrs. Adolphus G. Mosely, Miss M. A. Kennion, Mrs. George W. Lamb, Mrs. James E. Hale and Mrs. D. Southerland.

Best jar of raspberry cordial — N. W. Herring — $1.00.

Best jar pickles — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — $2.00.

Best mangoes — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — $1.00.

Best jar of jelly — Mrs. J. E. Hall — $2.00. Second best — R. J. Pearsall — $1.00.

Best preserves — Margaret Pearsall — $2.00. Second best — Mrs. James E. Hall — $1.00.

Best preserves (grape) — Stephen Graham — Diploma.

Pickles and preserves of a very superior quality were also exhibited by Mrs. Jere Pearsall, Mrs. George A. McClammy, Mrs. William L. Hill, Miss Caroline Avent, Mrs. Daniel T. Boney, Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly and Miss Kate Herring.

Best loaf corn bread — Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly — $2.00. Second best — Miss Kate Herring — $1.00.

Best pound cake — Miss Kate Herring — Diploma. Second best — Mrs. Kate L. Kelly — Diploma.

Best loaf wheat bread — Miss Alma Faison — a silver cup worth $15.00. Second best — Miss Dorothy A. Boney — a cup worth $10.00. Third best — Miss Priscella Hall — a cup worth $5.00.

Best bratrell cake — Miss Sarah Merkell — $1.00.

Best sugar cane syrup cake — Miss Sarah Merkell — $1.00. Mrs. Isaac B. Kelly exhibited some waffles from Chinese seed flour.





Best lot candles — Mrs. William Herring — $1.00. Second best candles — Mrs. I. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best specimen soap — Mrs. Benjamin Oliver — $2.00. Second best — Mrs. I. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best jar honey — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best bee's wax and dried fruits — Miss M. Shine — Diploma.

Best collection of flowers — Miss Christine Sprunt — $2.00.

Best bed quilt — Mrs. Elias Faison — $5.00. Second best — Mrs. A. J. Hurst (Onslow) — $4.00. Third best — Mrs. Teachey Boney — $3.00. Fourth best — Mrs. Teachey Boney — $3.00. Fifth best — Mrs. William Herring — $1.00.

Best woolen counterpane — Miss M. Martendale — $4.00. Second best — Mrs. William Farrior — $2.00. Third best — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00.

Best cotton — Mrs. Daul K. Kornegay — $3.00.

Best infants worked dress — Mrs. Alexander T. Stanford — $2.00.

Similar articles of very superior taste and skill were exhibited by Mrs. J. W. Carr, Mrs. A. G. Hicks, Mrs. M. Rhodes, Miss Sarah Oliver and others.

Best needle work consisting of a lot of Laover collars — $1.00.

Miss Bettie Herring, Bettie Herring and Dolly Moore also exhibited good specimen of needle work.

Best embroidery — Miss Mary Jones — $2.00. Second best — Miss Mag Larkins — Diploma.

Best worked ottoman cover—Miss Laura Murphy, Sampson—$1.00.

Best wrought collar — Mrs. G. W. Lamb — $1.00.

Best toilet table cover — Miss L. Wood — $1.00.

Best oil painting and pencil drawing — Mrs. D. Harriss — $1.00.

A fine hair wreath — Miss Laura Murphy — $1.00.

Best pair wrought slippers — Carrie Avisett — $1.00; Second best — Mrs. D. Harriss — Diploma.

Best homespun coat pattern — Mrs. Allen P. Hightower — $3.00. Second best — Mrs. J. A. Bryan — $2.00. Third best — Mrs. Benjamin Oliver — $1.00.

Best homespun pantaloons pattern — Allen P. Hightower — $2.00. Second best — Mrs. Joseph W. Outlaw — $1.00.

Best vest pattern — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00.

Best coat cut and made — Miss Mary A. Mallard — $3.00.

Best pants — Miss Mary A. Mallard — $2.00.

Best made vest — Mrs. Abie Kelly — $1.00.

Mrs. Stephen Herring, Mrs. Dolly A. Moore, Mrs. Henry Kornegay, Mrs. Sarah Southerland also exhibited fine samples of domestic cloth.

Best pair of woolen knit socks — fine article — $1.00.

Goods and socks were also shown by the Misses Churchwells and D. A. Moore.

Best improved stock chicken — John A. Bryan — $2.00. Second best — James E. Hall — $1.00.

Best native stock chicken — John A. Bryan — $2.00. Second best — George W. Middleton — $1.00.





Best lot of turkeys — Isaac Brown Jones — $1.00. Second best — N. W. Herring — Diploma.

Best geese — Livingston Faison — $1.00.

Best ducks — John J. Whitehead — $1.00. Second best — O. R. Kenan — $1.00.

Best pair corr. ducks — Stephen Herring — $1.00.

One hen with 20 chickens — Stephen Herring — 50c.

A fine rooster — Harper Williams Lumatra game — J. H. Williams. Coop of chickens by James E. Hall and other fine collection, etc.

Best buggy — N. C. made — Jonathan Chestnutt — $3.00.

Best set harness — George A. Newell — $2.00.

Best newly invented potato plough — William H. Toler — $2.00.

Best spirits turpentine barrel — Thomas Hall — Diploma.

A superior sample No. 1 rosin — Owen L. Fillyaw of Wilmington — Diploma.

An extra rake and improvement on guns — Hillory Pitman — $1.00, R. H. Furlaw, James Hall — Diploma.

One Singer sewing machine in operation — George A. Newell — Diploma.

A fine case of boot and shoes of superior workmanship — Murray and Blaney — Wilmington — Diploma.

Fine bull — Durham — A. M. Faison — $5.00.

Fine bull — Devon — William A. Faison — $3.00.

Fine bull — Native — A. G. Mosely — $1.00.

Milch Cow — Improved — Frank Faison — $5.00. Second best — Improved — $5.00. Third best — Devon — A. G. Faison — $2.00.

Heifer — Devon — A. M. Faison — $2.00. Second best — Native — J. J. McGowan — $1.00.

Best yoke oxen — Livingston Faison — $5.00. Second best — Robert Pridgen — $3.00. Third best — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Single ox — A. D. McGowan — $1.00. Second best — George A. McClammy — Diploma. Third best — H. J. Johnson — Diploma. Fourth best — Harper Williams — Diploma.

One lot fat cattle — Harper Williams — Diploma.

Bull calf — F. J. Faison — Diploma. Second best — A. G. Mosely — Diploma.

Heifer — A. M. Faison — Diploma. Heifer — J. E. Hall — Diploma. Heifer — R. M. Middleton — Diploma.

Fine milch cows were shown also by J. E. Carr, R. M. Middleton, James E. Hall, G. W. Lamb, B. F. Cooper, J. G. Branch and others.

Best stallion — Isaac Brown — $5.00.

Best jack — John Smith — $1.00.

Best brood mare — E. W. Montfort — $5.00. Second best — A. P. Hightower — $3.00. Third best — R. Pridgen — $1.00.

Best buggy horse — E. W. Ward — $3.00. Second best — B. Wetherington — $2.00. Third best — Robert Pridgen — $1.00.

Best carriage horses — E. W. Montfort — $3.00.

Best buggy horses — James C. Holmes — $1.00.





Best saddle horse — Thomas H. Kennion — $3.00. Second best — D. M. Pearsall — $2.00.

Best colt — Lemul Hodges — $3.00. Second best — Robert Pridgen — $2.00.

Col. Montfort Edward Pearsall and Harper Williams also exhibited some fine colts.

Best pair mules — H. Bowden — $3.00. Second best — A. P. Hightower — $2.00.

Fastest trotting horse in harness — Mr. Phelps — $1.00. Second fastest — John Stallings — $1.00. Third fastest — G. W. Lamb — $1.00.

Fastest racking horse — D. M. Pearsall — $1.00. Second fastest — I. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best harness mule — Mr. Cromartie — $1.00.

Best pair sheep — B. R. Cooper — $1.00.

Largest hog — D. C. Moore — $5.00. Second largest — W. B. Middleton — $3.00.

Best boar — Stephen Herring — $5.00. Second best — Thomas J. Kennion — $1.00.

Best sow and pigs — Isaac B. Kelly — $5.00.

Best lot shoats — G. W. Middleton, $5.00. Second best — D. M. Moore, $3.00. Third best — Jere Pearsall, $1.00.

Best pair Essex pigs — William A. Faison, $3.00. Best pair Essex pigs — James H. King, $2.00.

Best native pigs — N. E. Armstrong, $3.00. Second best — B. R. Cooper, $2.00. Third best — A. G. Mosely, $1.00.

Best Single pigs — B. R. Cooper, $2.00.

Messers Middleton, Williams, Harper, Carr, Johnson, Hall and Lamb also exhibited hogs which would show well out of Duplin.

Errors excepted,

Isaac B. Kelly, secretary





OFFICERS ELECTED

After reading out the above list of premiums, the president requested the members of the society to assemble in one of the rooms of the Grove Academy which they did at once and proceeded to the election of officers for the year 1857.

Then Jeremiah Pearsall, Esquire, was elected president; Rutledge James Dickson and O. R. Kenan, vice presidents; Isaac B. Kelly, recording secretary; and N. W. Herring, treasurer.

After said elections, on the motion of Benjamin Oliver, Esquire, the society adjourned.

The following essay was handed in by William R. Ward, Esquire, which was ordered to be spread upon the records of the society.

ESSAY — BY WILLIAM R. WARD, ESQUIRE

To Jeremiah Pearsall, President

Sir: The year that has transpired since our last fair is well calculated to teach us the importance of our vocation. It is to be hoped that industry and skill on our part will prevent the cry for bread that was heard in our land this summer from being repeated.

While the past season has been unusually favorable to the production of corn, our great staple; it has been unfavorable to the production of some other crops and these short crops and hard winters of two previous years have left the grannaries of this country more bare than for many years. It is therefore presumed that provisions and forage will be relatively as high a price for the coming years as at any time heretofore and thus afford the skillful producer ample profits for his labor and induce us to inquire into the relative value of the several crops suited to our soils and climate and the most valuable species of stock and the best mode of feeding and raising the same that our soil may be improved and our crops and stocks more abundant.

Corn is the first in the list of our crops for both grain and forage and is peculiarly adapted to our soil and climate producing an equally good quality of grain or high and low and light and heavy soils; but to make this or any other crop a source of profit to the producer, skill is necessary in the selection of the seeds and cultivation of the crop, for if the expenses incident to its production are greater than the value of the crop the producer is not gaining by the operation.

The same is true of all crops. The hard varieties of corn are best calculated to feed to all fattlings as they contain a layer proportion of oil and produce fat while the softer varieties are preferred to feed to working animals and for bread as they contain starch and elaborate muscle and thus give strength. The species of corn that mature low are preferable for several reasons, to those that grow tall, as the low varieties are less subject to be injured by storms and gusts and tornadoes, and the fodder more conveniently gathered and the stalks less troublesome in the subsequent cultivation.

In the preparation of the soil for this crop it is necessary to have it rich and thoroughly and deeply plowed. So great is the stress laid on deep plowing that it is generally admitted that for every inch deep that land is plowed and manured where the original fertility





has been exhausted and the soil of the proper texture that is, stiff enough, an additional yield of five bushels of grain may be realized, provided the crop is properly cultivated.

The time for planting has always been an important question and where so large a crop is raised as is generally the case in our country. The planting is generally the case in our country. The planting must necessarily extend throughout most of the season that will answer, but this fact does not necessarily preclude our inquiry into the most appropriate time. As a general rule light dry land should be first planted and this should not be done until bud appears on the poplar, and peach trees are in bloom. This crop will grow as far North and South as the flowering dogwood extends and the best time to plant is when the tree is in bloom. This was the Indian rule and they kept no calendar. This time is recommended as the most appropriate in the Patent Office Report for 1853 and experiments proves it true, so far as I am informed.

The mode of planting is various and this crop seems to possess great flexibility as the time and mode of planting, but it is a real advantage in the cultivation that the crop come up soon and grow off well as the time and labor of working small corn is greater than that of working it when considerably advanced.

Corn should be planted in drills and the hills so near together that one stalk to each will be a full crop, and at least twice as much seed should be planted in each hill as is intended to mature. This prevents succoring when the thinning out is delayed till the crop is well up, and when the land is in good order, it is that the final thinning be delayed until the corn receives the last working with the hoe and then the extra stalk should be cut off with the hoe and not uprooted. This prevents too heavy a growth. Rows or drills should be 5½ feet apart. Where the field has many stumps standing this gives room to go round them with the plow but in land clear of stumps and in good order 4½ feet drills produces the best crop other things being equal as distance one way does not compensate for crowding the other. No grass or weeds should be suffered to grow with the crop and to keep these down and not injure the crop or spend an undue amount of labor, requires skill. It is probably the most important art in profitable grain growing in this country. The ground should be well manured in the immediate vicinity of the seed with warm manure so that it may get large enough to bear plowing before the grass environs it, for once corn is large enough to bear sufficient soil to cover the small grass, the greatest difficulty in the cultivation is obviated in land that is clear of stumps, but among stumps the hoe is the chief implement of cultivation.

The plowing in all lands should be finished before the corn shows any tassels, for when the crop approaches maturity, plowing cuts the roots and thus prevents its filling out and makes the grain light. The last plowing should be shallow and the surface left as level as possible. All grass and weeds should be exterminated and the crop left clean. The after crop of weeds should be exterminated and the crop left clean. The after crop of weeds seldom injures the crop.

Manure to the farmer is what money is to the warrior and Phillip of Macedon said that no city was safe from invaders when a mule laden with gold could enter her gates however strong her garrisons





and fortifications might be. By the force of manure rocks of Gibralter are turned into fruitful gradens and by its application our worn out and sterile slopes and hillsides are turned into fields as productive as the valley of Egypt, hence we should make it a matter of our first and most diligent inquiry to learn the means by raising, protecting, and applying it, for by its use our most fertile lands may be doubled in their products and our most sterile (when of the proper texture) rendered as productive as the most fertile.

We all know that corn fed to a pig makes him grow and that the excretia of pigs applied to the soil makes corn grow, but the manner by which the largest amount of manure can be saved in the raising and fattening stock of all kinds is as much of a secret with a majority of us as is the art of war either of attacking or defending. In fact, the art of raising, protecting and applying manure to crops is to the farmer and planter what honesty and plain dealing are to morals. They constitute the pillows and stay of his business and prosperity, and without them he cannot prosper. Our Savior fed a vast multitude from 5 loaves and a few fishes and 12 baskets of fragments were taken up that nothing be lost and let us once take heed to this lesson, that nothing that will add to the fertility of our fields be lost and we will be able to see the force of the Peruvian proverb: “Guano, though no saint works many miracles.”

Then, Sir, if this is the means and the only means by which our fields are to be made rich and kept so, let us inquire if we can add anything practical to the present stock of knowledge on this important subject. And we begin by the assertion that hogs, the most expensive of our stock, can be so managed that the manure they raise, will more than reproduce their entire feed, but in order to effect this nothing should be lost and labor and care have to be practiced.

To begin, then, with the raising of hogs, they should have a lot well fenced and land that is to be cultivated the next season well littered with leaves and straw from the woods or fields and the litter should be renewed as often as is necessary to keep the lot clean and dry, with pens well sheltered and bedded for the winter and wet weather in summer for though the hog loves the mud as a bath it does not agree with them as a bed. In summer they should be shut from the shelter in pleasant weather, otherwise the beds become infected with vermin and contagious diseases are generated to which hogs are very subject. The hog should be fed and confined in their lot in the night and turned out to roam at their pleasure only in the day and in open weather in order to make the manure valuable and keep the lot sweet.

Plaster (or if not convenient), leached ashes should be liberally sprinkled over it once a week, or at any rate immediately before a renewal of the litter and at the end of the year or oftener the lot should be removed to a new and clean sweet place when all that has been thrown in the lot is good manure and the lot after thorough plowing and harrowing is in the least possible order to produce a crop of the superior quality of sweet potatoes if these directions are followed and the lot built on level land and the manure properly applied on soil of the right texture the increase of the crop will be greater than the feed of the hogs.





When hogs are fed for slaughter, they should be removed from the stock lot and have a lot convenient to their feed with plenty of litter to keep the lot dry and clean and if they are confined to the lot, their bed should be removed every day and the excretion sprinkled with gipsum, ashes or muck or clay to prevent the escape of ammonia as the excrements of hogs are unusually rich in this substance.

When hogs are running in the fields to gather their feed they should be lotted of an evening and fed with potatoes when they run in a pea field and corn when in a potato field and turned in the morning to pursue their labor. This keeps them gentle and secures them from the depredations of thieves and from getting into mischief to which they are very much addicted when running at large with no employment. Being in this respect like people, they should in all their lots have plenty of good litter for beds often renewed. Hogs managed in this way are really profitable for their manure pays for their feed and you have the meat extra.

Horned cattle have always been looked to as the chief source of manure and regarded as of no expense under our system of feeding on shucks and pasturing in the woods. They certainly are real friends for they act the part of scavengers and consume nothing valuable while they manufacture a large amount of manure for the field. In order to make the most of their excretia, they should in the winter have dry sweet stalls with good beds of straw renewed daily wherein they should be kept in cold and wet weather being suffered to run out only in the day time and in mild weather except to get water. Their manure is clear gain, as the growth of the stock will over pay for the labor and feed. In the summer they should have a lot on land that is to be cultivated the next season, otherwise the liquid excretia is lost and it should be known that the liquid excretia of any animal is worth twice as much as the solids and this is more than true of cattle. Their lot should be roomy so that the strong may not injure the weak and one half of the lot should be well bedded with straw and the other with loam from the hedges and ditchbanks for the cattle sometimes wish to lie on the ground and at other times prefer a bed of straw. Let the lot be removed to a new place every spring and after the litter is hauled off you have a piece of ground in the best order for sweet potatoes, while the litter is good manure.

As we can all testify who have any stock, neither cattle or hogs should have their lots or stalls in the same place two consecutive years as the scent of old lots is offensive and deleterious to the health of animals.

Horses have to be fed on grain and stabled nearly all the year. Their stables should be cleaned out once every month and new beds put in every other day. The first layer in the bottom after the stables are cleaned out should be clay or loam and on this, corn stalks, and on this, refuse hay or straw, and the renewal of the beds should be hay or straw; gipsum should be sprinkled freely over the stables twice every week, as this fixes the ammonia and keeps the stable sweet. Horses are expensive animals and I never have been able to make their manure reproduce their feed.

The breeds of hogs that are most profitable are those that will take on fat at any age. There is a very desirable quality, and are several species, known as “Guinea” that are generally favorites on this





account. The Guinea may be generally known as soon as seen or felt by their fine coat of hair and the absence of bristles and whether large or small, if his coat shows that he is guinea and his flesh mark in any way corresponds he is a favorite everywhere. No more hogs should be kept than can be well fed, and to make them profitable they should be lotted where their excrements can be collected as manure. The mode of feeding has been given in clause on raising manures.

Of horned cattle we have only the natives with the exception of a few enterprising farmers who are importing improved stock and it is hoped they may succeed in improving our stock by cropping. It is to be observed that all fine stock have a shinning coat of thick fine hair, and this is the best criterion by which to tell good stock whether imported or native. As coarse haired stock are both unthrifty and sorry milkers. Hence, whenever cattle are to be purchased let them have a fine coat of thick fine hair. It is a prevailing opinion that cattle with long legs and small stomach are sorry milkers and prove to mischief, and it is recommended that they be rejected as breeders.

Sweet potatoes are next (after corn) our most valuable crop, and generally too few are raised for economy. They are more valuable than corn as far as they can be used in its stead. They are more than equal to corn as feed for cattle and fully equal for hogs while they are comparatively lean, or in the first stage of fattening, and for raising hogs are preferable, and a sufficient quantity should be raised to feed the family cattle and pigs for three months plentifully and were it not for their liability to rot it would be difficult to say how far their profitable culture might be extended as the same manure and soil will produce thrice as much as in corn.

The several varieties that have small vines and leaves require a soil compartively light and not too highly manured and are earlier in maturing and not so nutricious as the larger vined varieties. These should be fed early, as the texture is loose and they rot or become light and loose their flavor, while the superior species require generally a heavy soil and one rich in all the elements of fertility, they continue to grow until frost and the meat is solid and if properly cultivated and housed, retain their texture and flavor during a year. They will fatten hogs sufficiently for marketable bacon and are a luxury for the table, the land (as before indicated) should be selected and manured according to the varieties should be thoroughly plowed and harrowed till the clods are broken up and the portion of the crop intended to be gathered should be planted in beds well drawn up with the hoe, otherwise they get cut and mangled in getting them out of the bed. The portion intended to be rooted by hogs should be planted on beds thrown up with the plow as they are much more easily cultivated. No grass or weeds should be permitted to grow with this crop in any of its stages, as they injure its growth and it is believed have a tendency to produce rot after the crop is gathered.

The time for planting from the seed is when the dogwood bloom is faded, the seed should be covered about two or three inches with good fine soil. The time for bedding seed to raise sets is when the bud appears on the poplar and peach trees are in full bloom. The set bed should be in dry stiff land, well manured with warm manure thoroughly mixed with the soil by the plow and harrow, the seed then laid on the surface and covered three inches with earth prepared as the bed and





taken from its immediate sides. This effectually secures the bed from being flooded. The surface of the bed should be kept clear of grass and weeds, and well stirred with a rake until the sets appear. They should remain until they are hard and well rooted and the weather is warm. As a general rule none should be set until the first of June, when set out too early they dwindle and are unfruitful, hence the common opinion that the second drawing produces the best crop.

All varieties of potatoes that I have raised (except the East India Yam) will grow from either seed or sets. Potatoes intended to be preserved through the winter should be killed up late, so that the upper end may not protrude above the soil, as light, or frost has a tendency to produce rot. I have the following directions from my neighbor, Miss E. Williams, (who has had plenty of potatoes for upwards of 60 years) for preserving them. Let a bed be laid out on dry land and raised at least six inches above the surface, and covered at least six inches with dry straw or hay and sheltered to protect the potatoes from sun and rain.

As soon as the mark of frost appears on the vines the potatoes should be dug (or plowed) and all that are cut or bruised laid aside, let the sound ones without being exposed to the sun or rain more than can be possibly avoided be laid in trays or shallow tubs (and not baskets) as they are too rough, and carried and laid on the bed and piled into as sharp a cone as possible until about thirty and not more than 40 bushels are collected, and for every 10 bushels of potatoes let one bushel of dry soil be poured evenly over the potatoes; then let the pile be wrapped in dry straw or hay at least 8 inches thick, around which corn stalks should be set so as to cover the whole closely, pressed in at the bottom and an additional bundle of straw eight inches long in diameter be set on the top. Then let the hill be banked up at least two feet thick in the top of the bundle which is to remain uncovered as a ventilator. Let the whole be well sheltered, and she adds, your potatoes will keep 19 times out of 20, If you kept the grass and weeds out of the crop, and raised them before the frost hurt them, and banked them up the same day that they were dug, or at least before they got the least sweet.

—William R. Ward.

MEETING — JANUARY, 1858

On the first Saturday in January, 1858, the Duplin Agricultural Society met in the courthouse in Kenansville, the president in the chair. After some discussion on the subject of agriculture in general it appearing that there was no business before the society they adjourned.

MEETING — APRIL, 1858

On the first Saturday in April, the 6th, 1858, the Duplin Agricultural Society met in the courthouse in the town of Kenansville. The president in the chair, on motion a committee consisting of Mr. John A. Bryan, John C. Mallard and William B. Middleton were appointed to make out a premium list for the next fair with instructions to report the same to the next meeting to be then finally acted upon. No other business coming up the society then adjourned.





MEETING — JULY, 1858

A meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held in the courthouse in the town of Kenansville on the first Saturday in July, 1858. The president in the chair, the committee heretofore appointed to prepare a premium list for our next fair reported one to the society which after some little alteration by them was adopted and the recording secretary was directed to have 200 copies printed in handbill form. Also he was instructed to have the same published in the “Wilmington Journal.”

Isaac B. Kelly, William M. Middleton and Alsa Southerland were appointed a committee to prepare the grounds for holding the next fair, power to make such repairs to the same as they deem expedient and to draw upon the treasure for funds to pay the costs.

Owen R. Kenan, Isaac B. Kelly and Jere Pearsall were appointed a committee to procure some person to deliver an address at the next fair.

On motion the society adjourned.

FIFTH ANNUAL DUPLIN FAIR — NOVEMBER, 1858

On Thursday the 5th, and Friday the 6th days of November, 1858, the 5th annual fair of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at their fair grounds near Kenansville. On Thursday the society met for business. Jeremiah Pearsall was re-elected president; James D. Nixon and Owen R. Kenan, vice president; L. M. Grade and Isaac B. Kelly, secretaries; and N. W. Herring, treasurer.

On Friday at 12 o'clock (in a hard shower of rain) the president escorted William A. Allen, Esqr., of Kenansville to the temporary stand in Farmer's Hall which had to be removed there from the Grove on account of the rain . . (Pages missing here in orginal manuscript.)

Premiums

(Pages missing here in orginal manuscript.)

. . . Mr. N. J. Farrior — Second best land — $1.00.

Mr. Quincy McGowan — best butter — $2.00. Second best butter — Mrs. C. D. Hill — $1.00. Third best butter — Mr. Edward Pearsall — Diploma.

Mr. J. B. Kelly — best homemade flour — $1.00.

Mr. John Green — best seed corn — 50c.

Mr. D. J. Middleton — best seed wheat — 50c.

Mr. Edward Pearsall — best seed rye — 25c.

Mr. E. W. Fonvielle (Onslow County) — samples apples — 15 varieties — $1.00. Mr. G. Westbrook — second best apples — Diploma.

Mr. James R. Hurst — best pears — 25c.

Mr. H. J. Johnson — seed pears — 25c.

Mr. A. D. McGowan — turnips — 25c.

Mr. James Dickson — potatoes — 25c.

Mr. James Dickson — pumpkins — 25c.

Mr. James R. Hurst — mellons — 25c.





Mr. James B. Carr — best bacon ham — $4.00. Second best bacon hams — $3.00. Mr. Edward Pearsall — third best bacon hams — $2.00.

Mr. James B. Carr — best old hams — Diploma.

Mr. James B. Carr — best shoulder — $2.00.

Mr. James B. Carr — best old shoulder — $1.00.

Mr. Edward Pearsall — best pickled pork — $2.00.

Mr. Gabe Boney — best acre upland corn (66 bushels) — $10.00. Second best — Mr. A. G. Mosely (53 bushels) — $6.00.

Mr. Jere Pearsall — best wheat (21 bushels) — $5.00.

Mr. Edward Pearsall — best rice (62 bushels) — $2.00.

Mr. Lewis Herring — sweet potatoes (443 bushels)—$8.00. Second best — (389 bushels) — $5.00. Third best (338½ bushels) — $3.00.

Mr. Abner Faison — best cotton (1250 lbs.) — $4.00.

Mr. W. B. Middleton — sow and pigs — $3.00. Second best — Mr. W. B. Middleton — $2.00.

Mr. Stephen Herring — best boar — $4.00. Second best — Jere Pearsall — $3.00. Third best — Henry J. Johnson — $2.00.

Mr. D. C. Moore — largest hog — $3.00. Second largest hog — Daniel T. Boney — $1.00.

J. B. Kelly — best lot hogs — $3.00.

G. W. Middleton — best lot shoats — $3.00. Second best — Alsey Southerland — $2.00. Third best — Jere P. Hall — $1.00.

George W. Middleton — best pair pigs — $4.00. Second best — James R. Hatch — $3.00. Third best — Jere Pearsall — $2.00. Fourth best — A. G. Mosely — fourth — $1.00.

W. A. Faison — best Jersey pigs — $2.00.

W. A. Faison — best bull — $2.00. Second best — A. M. Faison — Diploma. Third best — D. J. Middleton — Diploma.

J. A. Aventt — best milch cow — $5.00. Second best — A. G. Mosely — $4.00. Third best — A. M. Faison — $3.00.

F. J. Faison — best bull yearling — $2.00. Second best — F. J. Faison — $4.00.

William A. Faison — best heifer — $2.00. Second best — William H. Williams — $1.00.

J. A. Brian — best yoke oxen — $3.00. Second best — Stephen Herring — $2.00.

Henry J. Johnson — single ox — $1.00.

G. W. Wilson — best ox yoke — 50c.

Jonathan Chestnutt — best carriage — $3.00.

George A. Newell — best harness — $2.00.

J. C. Mallard — best plough — $2.00.

D. J. Woodward — model of a house — $1.00.

R. J. Carr — wooden stirrup — Diploma.

C. Myres — fine sample hats and caps — Diploma.

O. L. Fillyaw — sample roses — Diploma.

McInnis — cane — Diploma.

Miss L. E. Herring — splendid drawing — Diploma.





Mrs. G. W. Lamb — extra dressed poultry — Diploma.

Mrs. G. W. Lamb — painted map — Diploma.

Abner M. Faison — best stallion — $4.00. Second best — William J. Landler — $2.00.

James R. Hatch — best brood mare — $4.00. Second best — John D. Shiner — $2.00. Third best — John Mills — $2.00. Fourth best — John H. Carr — $1.00. Fifth best — E. Pearsall — Diploma.

John Mills — best colt — $2.00. Second best — J. B. Southerland — $1.00.

B. Witherington — best saddle horse — $2.00. George Williams — second best — $1.00.

David McIntire — best racker — $1.00. Second best — George Williams — Diploma.

A. J. Fordham — best trotter — $1.00. Second best — J. Tatom — Diploma.

Jas R. Hatch — best buggy horse — $2.00. Second best — J. R. Tatom — $1.00. Third best — William Hurst — Diploma.

Dr. J. W. Hill — best carriage horses — $3.00. Second best — G .T. Loflen — $1.50.

J. B. Monk — best jack — $1.00.

B. Olive — best pair mules — $2.00. Second best — Thomas Hall — $1.00.

Col. E. W. Montfort of Onslow County, Owen R. Kenan, John H. Pearsall and Stephen Herring, Esqr., exhibited fillies worthy of note and deserving diplomas.

John D. Carroll, Esqr., cultivated a piece of lowland in corn but on account of his not measuring a whole acre together he was ruled out by the committee though he produced in two parcels (making one acre) twenty one and one-half bushels (21½).





MEETING — JANUARY, 1859

At a meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held Saturday, January 8th, 1859 in the courthouse in the town of Kenansville this day, James Dickson, Esqr., one of the vice presidents was called to the chair. The committee heretofore appointed to procure from William A. Allen, Esqr., a copy of the address delivered by him at our last fair reported that he had consented to have it published and that he would furnish the society with a copy for the printer in a few days; the secretary was then requested to have 400 copies printed for distribution with instructions to draw upon the treasure for money to pay the expense.

On motion the following gentlemen were appointed by the chairman the Executive Committee of the society for the year 1859.

Jere Pearsall, Best ex officio, chairman; William B. Middleton, Esqr., Robert B. Carr, Esqr., Owen R. Kenan, Esqr., William A. Faison, Esqr., Benjamin Oliver, Esqr., and Edward Pearsall.

No other business before the society on motion of John J. Whitehead, Esqr., they adjourned to meet at Franklin Academy on the 5th of February next.

MEETING — FEBRUARY, 1859

Franklin Academy, Duplin Co., N. C.

Saturday, February 5th, 1859

A regular meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at this place. The president called the meeting to order. The secretary being absent, it was moved and carried that Dr. B. F. Cobb be appointed secretary pro tem which was carried.

Jere Pearsall, Esqr., then entertained the society with some very interesting and valuable remarks upon the cultivation of wheat stating that he had found decided advantage from top dressing it with Peruvian Guano at the rate of 150 pounds to the acre. After it was some 6 inches high he also urged the great necessity of deep plowing for nearly all crops — also the great importance of always selecting good seed of every kind.

About the time Mr. Pearsall was closing his remarks, Mr. Kelly, the secretary of the society, arrived and relieved Dr. Cobb from acting as secretary.

Benjamin Oliver, Esqr., inquired of the members for the best mode of appling Guano. Whether it would be best to apply alone or combine it with rich earth, ditch bank, stable manure, etc.

Col. C. D. Hill replied that he had found from experience that the best plan was to apply it alone which he generally did to the side of cotton late in the season, say about the time it began to bole. He had never applied it to any other crop to any extent.

Major O. R. Kenan stated that he had not used it but very little but was of the opinion that it would be better to apply it under crops. Which was sustained by Mr. J. G. Elliot as he believed if done so it would prevent the ammonia from escaping with the air. He also stated that if lime or ashes were applied to stable or barnyard manure it





would have the effect to render it almost worthless or it would destroy the ammonia it contained. William E. Hill, Esqr., stated that he was satisfied from experience that Guano pays well when used under cotton.

T. O. Rogers, Esqr., stated that he had used 200 lbs. to the acre of DeBeys Super Phosphate of Lime under wheat to profit. While he resided in Virginia his farm of a stiff clay soil but stated that he was of the opinion that our's was rather light for it.

Benjamin Oliver, Esqr., called upon Isaac B. Kelly to give his experience with use of Guano which he did, stating that he had used it with profit by applying about seventy-five pounds to the acre applied to the side of corn when it was about knee high.

On motion of Owen B. Kenan the society adjourned to meet at Warsaw on Saturday, the 3rd of March.

MEETING — MARCH, 1859

A meeting of the society was held at Warsaw on the 1st Saturday in March. Only a few members were in attendance. The secretary was not present being at the North. No records of the proceedings were kept so he can understand.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1859

October 1, 1859

A meeting of the society was held at the fair grounds. A most excellent dinner was prepared. All the old officers declined a reelection. Benjamin Oliver was elected president; H. Bowden and William R. Ward, vice presidents; D. J. Middleton, treasurer, and Dickson Mallard, secondary and J. T. Rhodes, corresponding secretaries. On motion the meeting was adjourned.

SIXTH ANNUAL DUPLIN FAIR — NOVEMBER, 1859

On Thursday and Friday the seventeenth and eighteenth days of November, 1859, the sixth annual fair of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at their grounds near Kenansville and notwithstanding the inclement weather the exhibition with one or two exceptions was much better than any heretofore held. William K. Devane of Sampson County delivered a most excellent address, who was introduced to the assembly by William A. Allen in a very happy manner, after which the premiums were read out by the chairmen of the different examining committees which were as follows:

Premiums

The committee on cropping report as follows:

CORN—

First prize — John Carr (82 bushels) — $15.00. Second — Alsa Southerland (71 bushels) — $10.00. Third — R. B. Carr (69 bushels) — $8.00. Fourth — G. Boney (67 bushels) — $5.00. Fifth — J. Carr (66 bushels) — Diploma.

WHEAT—

First prize — Jere Pearsall (29½ bushels) — $5.00.





COTTON—

First prize — William E. Hill (2900 lbs.) — $10.00. Second — William E. Hill (2366 lbs.) — $5.00. Third — A. M. Faison (2125 lbs.) — $3.00. Fourth — E. Pearsall (1074 lbs.) — Diploma.

First — A. M. Faison (5503 lbs. 3 acres together) — $3.00.

FIELD PEAS—

First prize — Jere Pearsall (29 bushels) — $2.00.

SWEET POTATOES—

First prize — W. D. Carr (290 bushels) — $2.00.

Mr. Julia Softin of Wayne gave a cropping of corn on one acre of low land producing 102 2/3 bushels not exhibited for a premium.

The committee on stock cattle reported as follows:

First Devon Bull — W. A. Faison — $4.00. Second Devon Bull — A. M. Faison — $3.00.

First cross bull — H. Williams — $3.00.

First native bull — W. B. Middleton — $1.00. Second native bull — D. J. Middleton — $1.00. Third native bull — J. J. Whitehead — Diploma. Fourth native bull — W. H. Williams — Diploma.

First bull yearling — F. J. Faison — $2.00. Second bull yearling — W. B. Middleton — $1.00. Third bull yearling — G. W. Middleton — Diploma.

For two calves of fine appearance — J. Q. McGowen; Three calves — A. D. McGowen; Three calves — A. M. Faison; Two calves — A. M. Faison. No premiums were offered, but to each a diploma awarded.

First heifer yearling — J. E. Hall — $2.00. Second heifer yearling — W. A. Faison — $1.00. Third heifer yearling — H. Williams — Diploma. Fourth heifer yearling — A. D. McGowen — Diploma.

First yoke oxen — J. B. Carr — $3.00. Second yoke oxen — S. Herring — $2.00. Third yoke oxen — H. Bowden — $1.00. Fourth yoke oxen — A. M. Faison — Diploma. Fifth yoke oxen — T. H. Kinnair — Diploma. Sixth yoke oxen — G. W. Middleton — Diploma.

First single ox — A. D. McGowen; Second single ox — H. J. Johnson. Third single ox — D. A. Moore. Fourth single ox — A. M. Faison. Fifth single ox — R. M. Middleton. These all received diplomas.

The entrance list having been mislaid, many cattle on exhibition under this head are not noticed.

First milch cow — A. M. Faison — $4.00. Second milch cow — D. M. Pearsall — $3.00. Third milch cow — A. D. McGowen — $2.00. Fourth milch cow — J. B. Carr — $1.00. J. Q. McGowen, M. J. Faison, D. J. Middleton received diplomas for their cows. H. Williams, F. J. Faison, J. E. Hall all had fine cows and entitled to diplomas for the same.

One good steer — J. Q. McGowen. Three good steers — A. M. Faison. Three good steers — A. D. McGowen.

One bull yearling — Dr. J. H. Faison.

One lot cottle — H. Williams. One lot cattle — A. D. McGowen. One lot cattle — A. M. Faison.

Sundry others who desired not to be noticed as on exhibition.





Largest hog — Stephen Herring — $3.00. Second largest hog — Stephen Herring — $2.50. Third largest hog — Stephen Herring — $2.00. Fourth largest hog — Steven Herring — $1.00.

Best lot of hogs — B. R. Cooper — $3.00. Second best lot of hogs — Jere Pearsall — $2.00.

Best boar — B. W. Middleton — $3.00. Second best boar — W. B. Middleton — $2.00. Third best boar — W. H. Williams — $1.00. Fourth best boar — J. J. Whitehead — Diploma. Fifth best boar — A. Southerland — Diploma.

Best sow and pigs — H. Williams — $3.00. Second best sow and pigs — W. Williams — $2.00. Third best sow and pigs — J. B. Kelly — $1.00. Fourth best sow and pigs — R. M. Middleton — Diploma.

Best lot shoats — A. Southerland — $3.00. Second best lot shoats — R. M. Middleton — $2.00. Third best lot shoats — J. J. Whitehead — $1.00. Fourth best lot shoats — J. C. Mallard — Diploma. Fifth best lot shoats — G. W. Middleton — Diploma.

Best pair pigs — G. W. Middleton — $4.00. Second best pair pigs — W. F. Pearsall — $3.00. Third best pair pigs — D. F. Jones — $2.00. Fourth best pair pigs — W. B. Middleton — $1.00.

Best pig — D. F. Jones — $2.00. Second best pig — G. W. Middleton — $1.00. Third best pig — J. B. Kelly — 50c.

In addition to the awards the committee recommended one fine sow by G. W. Middleton.

One fine lot shoats — E. H. Stanly. Fine lot shoats — H. J. Johnson, Fine lot shoats — W. A. Faison. Fine lot shoats — A. G. Mosely. Fine lot pigs — Jere Pearsall. Fine lot pigs — T. H. Kinnair. Fine lot pigs — B. R. Cooper.

And numbers of others that were good indeed. The showing on this item has not been beaten in the Old North State.

One fine stallion Touchstone — M. J. Faison and Bros. — $4.00.

One fine stallion Timoleon — W. B. Middleton — $2.00.

One fine stallion (not N.C.) — A. P. Shaw — Diploma.

One fine brood mare — W. B. Middleton — $4.00. Fine brood mare — W. A. Faison — $3.00. Fine brood mare — A. D. McGowen — $2.00. Fine brood mare — B. R. Cooper — $1.00.

Also Ed Pearsall, J. F. Shines, Jere Pearsall, B. Oliver, J. R. Hatch, H. Bowden, A. M. Faison, W. A. Faison and D. J. Middleton exhibited brood mares very deserving of notice.

One fine colt under two years old — J. B. Southerland — $3.00. Fine colt under two years old — A. M. Faison — $1.50. Fine colt under two years old — H. Bowden — $3.00. Fine colt under two years old — W. A. Faison — $2.00. Fine colt under two years old — S. Herring — $1.00.

One pair mules — T. F. Morris — $2.00. Pair mules — H. Bowden — $1.00.

Single mule — M. Moore — $1.00.

One lot of mules — D. J. Middleton — $2.00.

One jack — Scott Owens — $1.00. One jack — Scott Owens — Diploma.

In addition to this the committee recommended colts exhibited by H. Bowden, W. A. Faison, Thomas Hall, D. J. Middleton and E. Pearsall.





They received diplomas. Mules were exhibited also by O. B. Morisey and T. Hall. They also received diplomas.

Best pair carriage horses — Cooper Huggins — $4.00. Second best pair of carriage horses — P. Merritt — $2.00. Third best pair carriage horses — Dr. E. W. Ward — $1.00. Fourth best pair carriage horses — R. W. Ward — Diploma.

Best buggy horse — W. W. Whitehead — $3.00. Second best buggy horse — J. H. Pearsall — $1.50. Third best buggy horse — Dr. J. A. Fuqua — Diploma. Fourth best buggy horse — Wooten and Taylor — Diplomas.

Best trotter — A. P. Shaw (out of State) — time 2.55. Second best trotter — J. Barden — 3.10 — $3.00. Third best trotter — George Williams — $2.00. Fourth best trotter — J. F. Shines — $1.00.

Best racker — Samuel Torrens — $3.00. Second best racker — H. J. Carlton — $2.00. Third best racker — T. J. Moore — $1.00.

Best pair trotters — Dr. R. W. Ward — $2.00.

Best saddle horses — D. T. Boney — $3.00. Second best saddle horses — W. B. Middleton — $1.50.

Best pair draft horses — J. D. Southerland — $2.00. Second best pair draft horses — C. J. Allen — $1.00.

Besides these there were valuable horses exhibited by J. B. Carr, G. W. Middleton, P. Merritt, A. R. Shaw, J. R. Hatch, Thomas Hall, J. W. Smith, J. F. Shines, D. A. Thompson, Mr. Hussey, Mr. Cox, Mr Brown, and others but for which no premiums were offered. They received diplomas.

Best lot bacon hams — J. B. Carr — $5.00. Second best lot bacon hams — E. Pearsall — $4.00. Third lot bacon hams — G. W. Middleton — $3.00. Fourth best lot bacon hams — J. Q. McGowen — $2.00. Fifth best lot bacon hams — J. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best lard — W. W. Whitehead — $2.00. Second best lard — Thomas Hall — $1.00. Third best lard — J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best pickle pork — E. Pearsall — $3.00. Second best pickle pork — Thomas Hall — $2.00.

In this exhibition Mr. Jere Pearsall presented some superior hams and pickled pork, but asked no premium and there was also other presentations of bacon and lard by sundry persons deserving notice. They received diplomas.

Best homemade flour — W. B. Middleton — $2.00.

Best homemade meal — W. B. Middleton — $1.00. Second best homemade meal — W. B. Middleton — $1.50.

Best riding vehicle (N.C. make) B. R. Hood — $3.00. Second best riding vehicle (not N.C. made) — C. Huggins — $1.00.

Best combination plow — B. R. Hood — $2.00.

Best 12 point plow — Col. K. Raeford — $1.00.

Best cultivator — J. C. Mallard — Diploma.

Best pair hames — H. Bowden — 50c.

Best axle tree — H. J. Johnson — 50c.

Best side home tan leather — H. Williams — $1.00.

Best chewing tobacco — C. J. Allen — $1.00. Second best chewing tobacco — R. Wade — 50c.





Best set wagon gear — C. J. Allen — 50c.

Best basket — R. H. Forlaw — 50c.

Best horse cart — R. H. Forlaw — $2.00.

Best lot boots — J. P. Wallace — Diploma.

Best specimen seed corn — John Greer — $1.00.

Best specimen sweet potatoes — S. Herring — .25.

Best specimen irish potatoes — G. A. McClammy — .25.

Best specimen turnips — T. H. Kinnair — .25.

Best specimen seed rye — J. B. Kelly — .25.

Best specimen seed rice — J. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best specimen seed peas — W. H. Williams — $1.00.

Best specimen corn meal bolted — J. R. Hurst — $1.00.

Best specimen home made soup — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $2.00. Second best specimen home made soup — J. H. Faison — $1.00.

Best specimen tallow — J. H. Faison — $1.00. Second best tallow — Mrs. L. Carr — .50.

Best specimen cotton — B. Oliver — .25.

Best specimen seed oats — J. B. Kelly — .25.

Best specimen pumpkins — J. B. Kelly — .25.

Best specimen squash — H. Williams — .25.

Best specimen beets — G. A. McClammy — .25.

Best specimen pendars — H. Bowden — .25.

Best infants dress (tucked) — Miss R. J. Middleton — $2.00.

Best infants dress (braided) — Miss C. F. Pearsall — $2.00. Second best infants dress (braided) — Mrs. A. T. Stanford — $1.00. Third best infants dress (braided) — Miss S. E. Maultsby — .50.

Best infants dress (needle work) — Mrs. A. T. Stanford — $2.00. Second best infants dress (needle work collar and cuff) — Mrs. A. T. Stanford — $1.00.

Best infants cloak (embroidered) Mrs. D. B. Ford — $2.00.

Best infants sack — Miss D. Moore — $1.00.

Best bed quilt — Mrs. J. F. Shines — $5.00. Second best bed quilt — Mrs. E. W. Fonville — $4.00. Third best bed quilt — Mrs. D. T. Boney — $2.00. Fourth best bed quilt — Mrs. B. R. Cooper — $2.00. Fifth best bed quilt — Mrs. Dolly Edwards — $2.00. Sixth best bed quilt — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00.

A fine silk and worsted quilt by Mrs. J. F. Oliver — each $4.00.

Some beautiful ones were exhibited of extra workmanship by Misses Olivers. Miss R. J. Middleton, Mrs. Thomas Hall, Miss J. Friar, (but not asking a premium) only for decoration.

Best turffed cotton counterpane — Mrs. Clem Gillespie — $2.00. Second best turffed cotton counterpane — Mrs. D. Edwards — $1.00.

Best woven cotton counterpane — Mrs. C. B. McGowen — $1.00. Second best woven counterpane — Mrs. C. B. McGowen — $1.00. Third best woven cotton counterpane — John Carr — .50. Fourth woven cotton counterpane — J. W. Outlaw — Diploma.

Best woolen counterpane — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $2.00. Second best woolen counterpane — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00. Third best





woolen counterpane — Mrs. William Farrior — .50.

Best home made coat pattern — Mrs. Daniel Bowden — $3.00. Second best homemade coat pattern — Mrs. Daniel Bowden — $2.00. Third best coat pattern — Mrs. A. P. Hightower — $1.00.

Best home made pants pattern — Mrs. B. R. Cooper — $2.00. Second best home made pants pattern — Mrs. J. A. Bryan — $1.00. Third best home made pants pattern — Mrs. A. P. Hightower — .50

Best home made vest pattern — Mrs. A. P. Hightower — $1.00. Second best home made vest pattern — Mrs. J. A. Bryan — .50.

Best home made ladies dress pattern — Mrs. B. R. Cooper — $1.00. Second best homemade ladies dress pattern — Mrs. D. A. Moore — .50.

Best home made woolen socks — Mrs. B. Oliver — .75.

Best home made cotton socks — Mrs. William Herring — .50.

Best home made blankets — Mrs. B. Oliver — $1.00.

Best crotchet work — Mrs. William Herring — .50. Second best crochet work — Mrs. William Herring — Diploma.

Best fancy basket — Mrs. William Herring — Diploma and .50.

Best fancy painting — Miss Mary Black — $1.00. Second best fancy painting — Miss Mary Black — Diploma.

Best home cultivated flowers — Miss C. Sprunt — $2.00. Second best home cultivated flowers — Miss E. Sprunt — $1.00.

In addition to the above, there were many meritoriuos articles presented for exhibition, but too late for competition. And in this department was a powder horn of curious and elegant structure found by Capt. Marshall of Warren, N. C. during the Revolutionary War in S. Carolina. Dr. M. H. Murphy of Nash who presented this curiosity (being a batchelor) preferred to have it placed among the ladies.

Best tomato wine — Mrs. J. Pearsall — $1.00. Second best tomato wine — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best scuppernong wine — Mr. J. R. Hurst — $1.00. Second best scuppernong wine — Mr. R. W. Middleton — .50. Third best suppernong wine — E. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best wild grape wine — Mr. W. Herring — $1.00. Second best wild grape wine — Mrs. R. W. Middleton — .50.

Best Isabella grape wine — Mr. J. R. Hurst — $1.00.

Best strawberry wine — Mr. J. R. Hurst — $1.00.

Best black bullace wine — Mr. J. R. Hurst — $1.00.

Best blackberry wine — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $1.00. Second best blackberry wine — Mr. J. R. Hurst — .50.

Best peach cordial wine — Mrs. Wm. Herring — .50.

Best apple brandy (16 years old) — Dr. Murphy — Diploma.

Best apple jelly — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $1.00. Second best apply jelly — Miss R. J. Middleton — .50. Third best apple jelly — Miss A. Mallard — Diploma.

Best grape jelly — Mrs. John Greer — $1.00.

Best citron preserves — Mrs. M. E. Hill — $2.00. Second best citron preserves — Mrs. D. Thompson — $1.00.

Best quince preserves — Miss P. Hall — $2.00.





Best pear preserves — Miss E. Pearsall — $2.00. Second best pear preserves — Miss H. Hall — $1.00.

Best peach preserves — Miss E. Pearsall — $2.00. Second best peach preserves — Mrs. Thomas Hall — $1.00.

Best melon preserves — Mrs. Thomas Hall — $2.00.

Best brandy peaches — Mr. J. R. Hurst — $1.00. Second best brandy peaches — Mrs. J. Pearsall — .50.

Best sweet pickles — Mrs. D. Thompson — $2.00. Second best sweet pickles — Miss K. Farrior — $1.00.

Best home made sour pickles — Mrs. A. G. Mosely — $2.00. Second best home made sour pickles — Mrs. J. Pearsall — $1.00. Third best home made sour pickles — Miss R. J. Middleton — .50.

Best pickled mangoes — Mrs. J. Pearsall — $2.00. Second best pickled mangoes — Miss R. J. Middleton — $1.00.

Best speciman fruit — Mr. H. Williams — $1.00.

Best speciman apples — G. W. Middleton — $1.00. Second best speciman apples — C. M. Pearsall — .50.

Best dried apples — Mrs. S. Herring — .50.

Best rich candy — Miss Kate S. Kelly — $1.00.

Best butter — Mrs. N. Hall — $3.00. Second best butter — Mrs. H. Bowden — $2.00. Third best butter — Mrs. C. Gillespie — $1.00.

Best sarg jar extra — Mrs. N. Hall — Diploma.

Best soda biscuit — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50. Second best soda biscuit — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best plain biscuits — Mrs. N. Hall and Bowden — Diplomas.

Best gold cake — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best sponge cake — Mrs. H. Bowden — .50. Second best sponge cake — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best pound cake — Mrs. Thomas Hall — $1.00.

Best lemon cake — Mrs. Thomas Hall — .50.

Best persimmon pies — Mrs. Thomas Hall — .50.

Best corn bread — Mrs. N. Hall — $1.00. Second best corn bread — Mrs. Thomas Hall — .50. Third best corn bread — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best wheat bread — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $1.00. Second best wheat bread — Mrs. Herring — Diploma.

Best pair Bramah chickens — Dr. C. Harriss — $1.00. Second best pair Bramah chickens — H. J. Johnson — Diploma.

Best native chickens — H. J. Johnson — $1.00. Second best native chickens — S. Herring — Diploma.

Best pair half Bramah chickens — H. C. Stanford — $1.00.

Best pair Shanghai chickens — J. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best pair half Sunatra Game chickens — H. Williams — $1.00. Second best pair half Sunatra Game chickens — J. H. Faison — .50. Third best pair half Sunatrua Game chickens — W. Faison — Diploma.

Best S. Fence game chickens — W. Faison — $1.00.

Best geese — H. J. Johnson — .50. Second best geese — S. Herring — Diploma.

Best turkeys — J. B. Kelly — $1.00.





Best banyam chickens — J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best lot chickens — J. Q. McGowan — $1.00.

One beautiful duck — Thomas Hall — $1.00. Second duck — J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best pair Oconer opossums — J. B. Kelly — .50.

One raccoon — J. P. Charles — $1.00.

One lot sheep — G. W. Middleton — $2.00. Second lot sheep — H. Williams — $1.00.

CORN
—First Prize—

These certificates and mode of culture were handed in by John Carr to whom the first premium was awarded for the best arce of upland corn.

This is to certify we asserted John Carr, Jr., to measure off one acre of upland planted in corn.

October 14, 1859.

William D. Carr

William B. Carr

This is to certify that we the undersigned asserted the said John Carr, Jr., to gather and measure the corn grown on the said acre of upland and that it measured eighty two (82) bushels fair measure.

William D. Carr

John Greer

William B. Carr

MODE OF CULTURE

I selected a piece of stiff piney woods land which has been cleared and under cultivation for about ten years on the 12th of May, 1859, ran it off in rows about five feet apart, ran tow furrows with a throwing plough, then two furrows with a subsoil all in the same place which mellowed it throughly. I applied 200 lbs. guano in the drill, throwed two furrows on the same then subsoiled in the same furrow throwed one more furrow on each side. Then I split the ridge thus formed with the bar side of a common plough and planted the corn 15 inches apart, one grain in a hill on the 22nd of May. Next I split out the middles and ground all over. In about another week I plowed every other row and applied 100 lbs. of guano and the next week I plowed the remaining rows and applied another 100 lbs. of guano. All done as will be seen. The last plowing was done very shallow near the corn. The guano cost $12.50. The land would have brought about 6 barrells corn with the guano.

Signed: John Carr, Jr.

CORN
—Second Prize—

The following was handed in by Alsa Southerland, Esqr. to whom the second premium was awarded.

Signed: Alsa Southerland





MODE OF CULTURE

“On the first day of March, 1859 I gave the land a light dressing of corn post manure made from pines, wood, meadow turf mixed with lime. On the 11th day of May following, I threw up beds of five furrows each at a distance of four and a half feet apart. I planted the corn on the same day at a distance of 2½ feet on the drill three grains in a hill. At the first plowing I applied 150 lbs Rhodes Super Phosphate of Lime between the hills in the drill and chopped it out. About two weeks afterwards I plowed out every other row and applied 100 lbs Peruvian guano in the first furrow next to the corn and about two weeks later plowed out the remaining rows and applied 200 lbs. of guano in the same way and hilled it up. On the 10th day of October I gathered and measured 70 11/16 bushels of corn.”

I, William David Carr, do hereby certify that I measured the above mentioned acre of land and corn and pronounce the piece of land one acre and the yield 70 11/16 bushels.

Signed: W. David Carr.

CORN
—Third Prize—

The following was handed in by Robert B. Carr to measure off an acre of upland planted in corn fair measure.

Signed: Daniel I. McKeithan

This is to certify that we asserted the said Robert B. Carr to gather and measure the corn grown on the said acre of upland and that it measured 61½ bushels fair measure.

Signed: James Dickson

Joseph H. Carr

MODE OF CULTURE

“I selected a piece of stiff woods land which had been cleared and under cultivation three years. I hauled about 60 loads (ox) of rich soil off of Kitchen Garden and about 15 of barn yard manure on it and spread, broadcast and plowed it in about 5 inches deep in March. In May I flused it up to kill the grass. On the first day of June I laid it off in rows 5 feet apart and applied 250 lbs of Peruvian guano and planted the corn dropping 3 grains in a hill 18 inches apart. Two weeks after this I ploughed it deep, hoed and thinned to 2 stalks in the hill. Two weeks later I plowed every other row very shallow, applying 125 lbs guano. Then I hoed it out and did no more. The land would have about 4 barrels corn. Guano cost $11.”

Signed: R. B. Carr

CORN
—Fourth Prize—

Handed in by Gabe Boney to whom the fourth premium was awarded.

“The kind of land and mode of cultivation upland clay subsoil, about the 20th of April. I laid off the rows four and one-half feet apart two furrows in a place. I put about 300 lbs. guano in the





furrows and throwed 2 heavy furrows to make the ridge. About the 27th I ran a small plow on the top of the ridge and planted the corn 14½ inches apart. After it came up I ran a subsoil plow in the old list furrows. On the 20th of May I broke the ground very deep with a small plow and hoed out the corn and thinned out to one stalk. About one week after hoeing, about the 15th of June I plowed every other row four furrows to the row and applied 150 lbs. guano. About the 21st of June I plowed the other rows the same way and applied 150 lbs. more guano and gave it a very light hoeing on the last day of June. The corn was badly blown down with the wind and considerably broken and was very much injured by drought in July. The cost of the guano was $19.00. No other manure was used. The yield was 67 bushels fair measure.”

Respectfully submitted

Signed: Gabe Boney

This is to certify that we asserted to measure one acre of upland corn and the corn from the same acre for Gabriel Boney and by close measure say that he made 67 bushels per acre.

October 10, 1859

Signed: Jacob Wells

W. J. Boney

Handed in by John Carr, Jr., to whom a diploma was awarded.

This is to certify that we asserted John Carr, Jr., to measure off one acre of upland planted in corn on the 20th day of October 1859.

Signed: David Carr

William B. Carr

This is to certify that we asserted John Carr, Jr., to gather and measure the corn grown in the above mentioned acre and that it measured sixthy-six (66) bushels fair measure.

October 20, 1859

Signed: David Carr

John Carr

William B. Carr

MODE OF CULTURE

“I selected a piece of stiff island land that had been under cultivation some fifteen years with a clay subsoil. In April I hauled on it about 50 ox loads of ditch bank and ran the ground off in rows 5½ feet apart, two furrows in a place and throwed the ditch bank and manure in those furrows, applying 100 lbs. of guano. Then I ridged up and split out in the usual way and planted the corn in the usual way, thirty inches apart, two grains in a hill. About the 8th of May, which was in three weeks, I finished splitting the middles which was done as deep as one horse could pull. One week after this I harrowed the land all over. Two weeks after this was done I plowed out every other row and applied 100 lbs. guano to the side of the corn. On the 10th of July I plowed out the other rows and applied





another 100 lbs. of guano in the same manner and hoed it out. The last plowing was done very shallow. The land would have made about 5 barrels of corn. The guano cost $9.75.”

Signed: John Carr

Handed in by Jeremiah Pearsall to whom the first premium was awarded for the best acre of wheat.

I hereby certify that I measured an acre of wheat for Jere Pearsall the product of which was thirty-nine bushels.

Signed: James B. Carr

“The wheat above mentioned was gathered in a wet time so that I carefully dried and refaned it and then it measured twenty-nine and a half (29½) bushels. The land was light and had been cleared a long time. It was slightly covered with mold on surface earth. I applied about 100 lbs. of guano to the acre about the 1st of April. I applied 100 lbs. guano more, broadcast it. The wheat was gathered in June.”

November 17, 1859

Signed: Jere Pearsall

Handed in by William E. Hill to whom the 1st premium of $10 was awarded for the largest yield of cotton to one acre.

This is to certify that I weighed acre no. 1 of William E. Hill's cotton with good scales and the cotton that came from it weighed 2900 pounds of good cotton. I also weighed acre no. 2 and it weighed 2366 lbs. Mr. Hill was present when it was weighed.

November 17, 1859

Signed: B. B. Lewis

REPORT ON COTTON

“To the committee on Agriculture of the Duplin County Agricultural Society:

“As a competitor for the largest yield of cotton from one acre of ground, I therewith present the certificate of Mr. B. Lewis of the amount of cotton made on one acre of ground. Also a report of the mode of culture. The lot of ground was measured off with a chain and compass seventy yards square, that being considered one acre of land. Early in the spring I think about the first of March, I had by estimate in one hundred and seventeen horse cart loads of stable manure hauled upon it, scattered, broadcast and plowed in very deep. I then let it remain until the 23rd day of following April when I had it run off in rows 4 ft. apart. On the 25th of April, two days after it was run off, I sewed 150 lbs. guano in the drills and had the ground thrown up in very high beds 4 feet apart. I then had the beds opened very shallow with the climinar scerter plow and planted the cotton seed and covered them with a board as lightly as possible to hide the seed. On account of the drought it was sometime before the cotton came up. As soon as practicable after it came up I had a small fluk or sweep plow run very close to the cotton. I then chopped it out to one and two stalks, generally one stalk, occasionally two stalks when there was a missing place. The stalks were ranging by estimation from 12 to 18 inches apart. I then gave it a second





plowing with the sweep plow. In about ten or twelve days I gave it a very thorough raking with an iron rake pulverising the soil and removing all the young grass. After which I plowed it twice more with a larger sweep running very shallow and being very careful not to plow down the beds. I then gave it the last working with hoes by removing the bunches of grass. I did not manure it at all after the cotton was planted. I will state that the cart in which I hauled the manure was a very small horse cart carrying only two small heaps at a load, making scarcely enough to coat the ground over. The cotton was also secondly injured by the dry weather. As it remained in the ground several weeks, not having enough rain to bring it up. I will now state the mode of cotton of the 2nd acre mentioned in the certificate. The first having made 2900 lbs. of seed cotton and the 2nd 2366 lbs. cotton. The ground was well broken early in the spring and the rows run off three feet apart. On the 22 of April about 150 lbs. of guano was sowed in the drill, beds were thrown up 3 feet apart and the cotton planted, similar to the first acre. Several barrels of ashes were scattered upon the ground sometime during the season. I do not recollect the precise time. On the day the cotton was planted, rain enough came to bring it up in a very short time thereby giving it some two weeks the start of the first acre. As soon as it came up a good stand it was plowed out similar to the first acre and thinned out to one stalk, occasionally two, some ten or twelve inches apart. It then received several plowings with sweeps and one or two hoeings every ten or twelve days until the last of July when it was laid aside. All of which is respectifully submitted.”

Signed: William E. Hill

This is to certify that I measured and weighed for Edward Pearsall one acre of cotton which made 1074 lbs.

Signed: A. D. McGowen

The above cotton was planted on light sandy land and lightly sprinkled with cow yard manure and cultivated in the ordinary way with 4 plowings and 3 hoeings.

Signed: Edward Pearsall

Handed in by Abner M. Faison to the second premium for the best yield of cotton was awarded.

This is to certify that I have seen gathered from one acre of land twenty one hundred and twenty five pounds (2125 lbs). of seed cotton and 5,500 lbs. from three acres of Mr. Abner M. Faison's land.

November 18, 1859

Signed: David G. Sellers

The following certificate and mode of culture was handed in by William D. Carr, Esqr. to whom the first premium was awarded for the largest yield of sweet potatoes on one acre of land.

This is to certify that I asserted Mr. William D. Carr to measure off an acre and measure the potatoes grown on it and that it measured two hundred and ninety bushels.

Signed: J. H. Carr





MODE OF CULTURE

I selected a piece of stiff piney woodsland that had been under cultivation twelve years, broke it up deep early in the spring. In May I laid it off. The rows were 4 feet apart and filled the furrow full of barnyard manure. In June 1 plowed and drew up the ridges with the hoe and planted the sprouts, wed and bond them out fifteen days and ten days after that time I plowed and hilled them up.

November 2, 1859

Signed: W. D. Carr

MODE OF PICKLEING PORK

By Thomas Hall

Salted down three weeks then taken up and worked and packed down with alum salt between each layer. Then a strong brine made by boiling and suffered to get cold when the barrell was filled up with it.

HOW TO SAVE BACON

By Edward Pearsall, Esqr.

After killing the hogs let them hang on the gallows until they get perfectly cold then cut them up with a plenty of salt, well rubbed in, then apply to each ham a small portion of finely pulverized salt-petre and after remaining in salt for at least four weeks to take up and hang up to smoke. Let it be well washed before doing so. I generally smoke with sweet gum chips and sometimes with hickory wood. About the middle of February I take it down which is before the bug lays the eggs and apply dry ashes with a little lime mixed with them on the flesh side and well rub them on and lay on a shelf with the flesh side up so that it will not touch.

HOW TO SAVE PORK

By Edward Pearsall, Esqr.

After killing and allowing the hogs to become cool I cut them up and salt them down the same as for bacon and suffer it to remain in salt 4 or 5 weeks. I then take it up and cut it in pieces of suitable size to pack close in the barrell with one layer of salt and one of pork until the barrell is filled. Then head it up air tight until wanted for use. No brine or water should be put in. Three pecks salt will do for each barrell.

Respectfully submitted

Signed: Edward Pearsall





MEETING — JULY, 1860

Kenansville, N. C.

July 7, 1860 (Saturday)

A meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held this day in the courthouse. Benjamin Oliver, the president, elected for the year 1860 in the chair, took upon himself the duties of the office. Dickson Mallard who was elected recording secretary for 1860 being absent, on motion Isaac B. Kelly was requested to act in his place.

On motion of Jeremiah Pearsall the president appointed Owen R. Kenan, G. W. Middleton and Jeremiah Pearsall, Esqr. a committee to inquire into the practiability of building a Floral Hall on the Fair Grounds. Also as to the property of enlarging or removing the same with the request that they report to the next meeting of the society.

Executive Committee

The following gentlemen were appointed the executive committee for the year 1860.

Benjamin Oliver, president; William B. Middleton, Jere Pearsall, O. R. Kenan, J. A. Bryan, Edward Pearsall, Joel Loftin.

On motion of Jeremiah Pearsall, Esqr., Owen R. Kenan, William A. Allen and John J. Whitehead, Esqrs. were appointed a committee to audit and settle the accounts of the late treasurer.

On motion of Owen R. Kenan, Esqr., the secretary was requested to copy on the records of the Society the original paper that was signed when the Society was first started which is as follows:

“OCTOBER 17, 1853”

“The undersigned, believing that the agricultural interest of the county would be promoted by the formation of a society for concolation comparison etc., do associate ourselves together for that purpose and agree to be governed by the act of the General Assembly, Chapter 2 passed at its session in the year 1852 and agree further to be governed by such bylaws and regulations as may be enacted by a majority of our said Society in public meeting assembled.”

The above is in the handwriting of Jeremiah Pearsall, Esqr., who first started the Duplin Agricultural Society and was signed by the following persons:

Issac B. Kelly, James Pearsall, Jesse Swinson, H. C. Kornegay, John Bennett, N. W. Herring, Harper Williams, G. W. Middleton, Uriah Herring, James Dickson, James G. Stokes, William B. Middleton, O. R. Kenan, C. McMillan, David Southerland, B. W. Herring, J. Q. McGowen, W. W. Miller, John B. Southerland, D. Reid, John B. Harper, James B. Carr, John Gilliespie, James R. Hurst, Dickson Mallard, A. G. Mosely, John D. Carroll, W. D. Pearsall, Joel Loftin, William W. Faison, Blaney Williams, S. Graham, W. R. Ward.

John M. Chastin, Boney Wells, Sr., J. G. Branch, Howell Best, John W. Boney, James Alderman, John J. Whitehead, James W. Grady, Hugh Maxwell, R. D. Sloan, C. J. Houston, Hargate Kornegay, J. D. Abernathy, William E. Hill, Henry H. Hodges, Isaac W. West,





Benjamin F. Cobb, J. D. Carr, Jere Pearsall, C. J. Oates, D. J. Southerland, A. Houston, Gibson Carr, H. Bowden, William J. Kornegay, Grady Outlaw, Daniel Williams, Cartis C. Oates, John C. Mallard, Edward Pearsall, R. J. Pearsall, Stokes Wells, Henry W. Grimes, James E. Ward, James Hall, G. Smith, Henry R. Kornegay, William L. Johnson, William Farrior, J. H. Jerman, D. C. Moore, John Smith, Thomas Hill, Frances Williams, Jesse P. Jordan, George E. Houston, James Williams, Alfred Hollingsworth, Stephen Herring, Sr., John Dobson, Edward W. Houston.

A. T. Stanford, James M. Sprunt, C. W. Graham, A. Holmes, W. J. Houston, Henry Grimes, D. F. Chambers, A. H. Grady, James W. Blount, L. M. Hines, Thomas J. Carr, Alsa Southerland, J. T. R. Miller, Patrick Merritt, A. R. Hicks, Osborne Carr, John Carr, M. J. Taylor, Isaac Brown.

On motion of John J. Whitehead that the society meet on the first Saturday in March, and on motion of William . . . (Pages lost here from original manuscript.)

MEETING — MARCH, 1860

At a meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held in the courthouse in Kenansville the 1st Saturday in March, 1860, the meeting was called to order by the president and the minutes of the last meeting ordered to be read, which was done and approved.

Reports of committees appointed at the last meeting were then called for. When Jeremiah Pearsall, Esqr., chairman of a committee appointed to inquire into the practibility of building a Floral Hall on the fair grounds of this society reported that such a building was indispencibly necessary, after some discussion, it was ordered on motion fo Jere Pearsall that said Floral Hall be built.

(Pages torn out here in original manuscript.)

The article of tiling, for draining land, being discussed at some length, on motion of William R. Ward, was laid over now but to be brought up at the next meeting.

On motion, this meeting adjourned to meet at its next regular time, the 1st Saturday in April next.

D. Mallard, Rec. Sec.

At this meeting the treasurer gave notice that he would at a future meeting make a motion to raise the iniating fee of this society.

D. Mallard, Rec. Sec.

MEETING — APRIL, 1860

Kenansville, Duplin County

April 7th, 1860. (Saturday)

A meeting of the Agricultural Society of Duplin was this day held in the courthouse in Kenansville.

The meeting was called to order by the president and the minutes of the last meeting ordered to be read which was done and approved.





On motion of O. R. Kenan it was ordered that the present committee on Model farms be increased to eight members instead of three as it now stands, whereupon the president appointed an additional . . . (Pages torn out here in original manuscript.)

MEETING — JUNE, 1860

A meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was this day held in the courthouse in Kenansville. The society was called to order and the minutes of the last meeting read and approved.

On motion of Col. . J. Whitehead, the subject of applying domestic manures, being now discussed, also laid over for discussion at the succeeding meetings.

On motion it was ordered that the corresponding secretary of this society be requested to get up a general correspondence upon all subjects that may suggest themselves to his mind, by which this society may be benefitted.

Further resolved, that he be now specially requested to obtain all the information he can upon the subject of Swamp land drainage, the best machinery in use for that purpose, etc. Also upon the subject of tiling and report to some future meeting of this society.

On motion it was ordered that this society adjourn to meet . . . . . (Pages torn out here in original manuscript.)

MEETING — SEPTEMBER, 1860

At a meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society held in the courthouse in Kenansville on Saturday, the 1st day of September, 1860, all officers and a goodly number of the members were present. The president, calling the meeting to order, announced the society ready for business.

It was moved and seconded that reports of previous committees be called for.

First-Committee on Floral Hall Building called for. It reported no progress except the gathering the lumber. Same committee continued.

Second - Committee on orator reported no orator obtained. Same committee continued.

The subject of tiling was then considered when on motion by O. R. Kenan, Esqr., it was ordered that further information be obtained by the corresponding secretary whether the Tiling Machine of Professor Mapes be portable or not and any other information on the subject he may think proper to inquire for.

On motion, it was ordered that the Horse Scoop presented to this society by Col. J. J. Whitehead be cordially accepted.

On motion, it was ordered that the same committee to audit the treasurer's account. To be continued.

On motion, by Jeremiah Pearsall, Esqr., it was ordered that the





next annual fair of the society be held on Thursday the 1st day of November next.

On motion by O. R. Kenan, Esqr., it was ordered that the executive committee with the aid of the Marshal, make out a program for the government of the fair.

On motion by O. R. Kenan, Esqr., it was ordered that the fair grounds be opened for the reception of articles to be exhibited on Wednesday and to be kept open until Thursday, 10 o'clock at which time the exhibition will commence, and that the articles brought for exhibition be under the protection and control of the society until the fair is over; also that the secretaries of the several committees be requested to attend on Wednesday at 10 o'clock and that this resolution be published.

On motion, it was ordered that exhibitions of any article or animals shall have the liberty of selling the same at the fair; the time of which will be made known by the proper officio, and that this resolution be published in connection with the above.

On motion, it was ordered that the treasurer be allowed the privilege to deputize an assistant at the time of the next fair.

Notice is given to this society by D. J. Middleton that at some future meeting a resolution will be offered to so amend the constitution, that more than one treasurer may be appointed.

On motion, it was ordered that this society adjourn to meet the 1st Saturday in October next.

D. Mallard, Sec.

MEETING — SEPTEMBER, 1860

A called meeting of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held in Kenansvile on the 25th day of September, 1860.

It was ordered that the resolution passed at the last meeting be resended fixing the time of holding the fair, and that the time be postponed to the 15th day of same month; and that the secretary be requested to publish the same in the “Wilmington Journal” and that R. H. Cowen will deliver the address to the society.

It was ordered that the secretary of this society be authorized to employ an assistant to aid him at the fair on such terms as in his opinion will be advantageous to the society.

On motion it was ordered that this society adjourn to meet at its regular time the 1st Saturday in October next.

D. Mallard, Sec.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1860

The society met according to adjournment on 1st Saturday in October. The president being absent, H. Bowden was requested to take the chair.





In consequence of so few being present the election of officers was postponed till the 1st Saturday in November next, when on motion the society adjourned to meet again at its regular time the 1st Saturday in November.

D. Mallard, Sec.

MEETING — NOVEMBER, 1860

The society met according to adjourning at the courthouse the 1st Saturday in November, 1860.

A quorum being present the society proceeded to business.

On motion it was resolved that in consequence of the sparceness of members present, the election of officers be postponed till the second day of the fair to be held the 15th and 16th of November.

On motion, it was ordered that the time of receiving articles for exhibition at the next fair be extended to 12 o'clock on Thursday instead of 10 o'clock as the former ordered.

On motion, the society adjourned to meet at the call of the president at the fair grounds.

Dickson Mallard, Sec.

MEETING — NOVEMBER, 1860

The Society met according to adjournment on the 15th day of November, 1860 (at the fair grounds) when a quorum being present, the Society proceeded to elect officers for the insuing year.

Officers Elected

All the old officers were reelected. President, Benjamin Oliver, Esqr.; Vice presidents, H. Bowden and William R. Ward, Esqrs.; Recording Secretary, Maj. J. F. Rhodes; Treasurer, David J. Middleton, Esqr.

No other business being before the meeting, on motion, it was ordered that this meeting adjourn to meet at its regular time the 1st Saturday in December, 1860.

Dickson Mallard, Sec.

SEVENTH ANNUAL DUPLIN FAIR — NOVEMBER, 1860

On Thursday and Friday the 15th and 16th days of November, 1860, the seventh annual fair of the Duplin Agricultural Society was held at the fair grounds near Kenansville.

The weather being very favorable, a larger assembly was collected than was known on a previous occasion. The fair was a complete success. R. H. Cowan of Wilmington delivered a most excellent address, who was introduced to the vast crowd assembled by William E. Hill, Esqr., after which the reports of the different committees on premiums were read from the stand by Maj. O. R. Kenan which were as follows:





Premiums

Best acre of Up Sano Corn (79½ bushels) — G. Boney — $4.00. Second best acre — (66 bushels) — John Carr — $2.00. Third best acre — (58½ bushels) J. R. Ezzell — $1.00.

Best acre wheat — (24 1/10 bushels) E. Pearsall — $2.00.

Best acre cotton — (1800 bushels) — J. T. Shine — $4.00.

Best bale cotton — C. D. Hill — $3.00.

Best sample Seco Corn — Daniel K. Kornegay — .25. Second best — Robert H. Farlow — Diploma. Third best — Daniel T. Boney — Diploma.

Also fine samples of Seco Corn were exhibited by J. G. Kelly, O. R. Kenan, David Green, S. A. Merriman, David J. Middleton, Stephen Herring, Henry J. Johnston and Benjamin Oliver.

Best sample wheat — Daniel Kornegay — .25. Second best sample wheat — Edward Pearsall — Diploma.

Best sample rye — J. B. Kelly — .25. Second best sample — D. J. Middleton — Diploma. Fine samples were exhibited by J. B. Kelly and Jeremiah Pearsall.

Best sample oates — J. C. Mallard — .25.

Best sample field peas — Daniel K. Kornegay — .25.

Best sample cotton — Benjamin Oliver — .25.

Best sample potatoes — Stephen Herring — .25. Second best sample — William B. Middleton — Diploma. Third best sample — J. B. Kelly — Diploma. Fine specimen were also exhibited by H. J. Johnston and B. Oliver.

Best specimen turnips — David M. Pearsall — .25. Second best — J. B. Oliver — .25. Third best — J. Callalland — Diploma. Also fine specimen were exhibited by D. K. Kornegay, James Garrason, Jeremiah Pearsall, J. D. Carroll, John H. Pearsall, George M. Clamma, H. Bowden, D. Mallard, William E. Hill and Thomas Hall.

Best specimen beets — George A. McClammny — .25.

Best specimen pumpkins — Thomas Hall — .25. Second best — O. R. Kenan — Diploma.

Best specimen squash — David Brown — .25.

Best specimen Japanese Pu Melon — S. Gillespie — .25.

Best specimen watermelon — John Q. McGowen — .25.

Best specimen collards — Jeremiah Pearsall — .25.

Best specimen peanuts — George A. McClammy — .25.

Best specimen fruit trees — R. W. Middleton — .25.

Best specimen apples — Dickson Mallard — .25. Second best — Jere Pearsall — Diploma. Other fine specimen were also exhibited by H. Bowden Benjamin Oliver and Maj. Lizzie Pearsall.

Best specimen dried apples —Mrs. H. Bowden — .25. Second best — Mrs. Linda Carr — Diploma. Third best — Mrs. C. D. Hill — Diploma. Fourth best —Mrs. Stephen Herring — Diploma.





Provisions

Best bacon hams — George W. Middleton — $5.00. Second best — H. Bowden $4.00. Third best — John Green — $3.00. Fourth best — Edward Pearsall — $2.00. Fifth best — Benjamin Oliver — $1.00. Other fine specimen were also exhibited by Jere Pearsall, John Q. McGowen, J. J. Whitehead, L. A. Merriman and William N. Williams which were considered highly meritorious.

Best lot pickled pork — Mrs. Linda Carr — $3.00. Second best lot — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — $2.00. Third best lot — Mrs. George A. McClammy — $1.00. Other fine specimen were exhibited by Mrs. John A. Bryan, Mrs. Linda Carr, G. W. Middleton, W. W. Whitehead and John Carr.

Best specimen butter — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $1.00. Second best — Abner M. Faison — .50. Third best — Thomas Hall — .25. Fourth best — David M. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best specimen corn meal — H. Bowden — $1.00. Second best — William B. Middleton.

Best specimen soap — Mrs. G. W. Middleton — $1.00. Second best — J. B. Kelly — Diploma. Third best — John A. Bryan — Diploma.

Best specimen candles — Mrs. R. S. Stanly — .50. Other specimen of candles were exhibited by Mrs. W. Middleton, Mrs. J. B. Kelly and Mrs. Stephen Herring.

Best specimen starch — Mrs. D. J. Middleton — .25. Second best — Mrs. John A. Bryan — .25.

Best crab apples — Mrs. J. M. Sprunt — .50.

Best quince preserves — Mrs. W. W. Whitehead — .50.

Best cherry preserves — Mrs. Thomas Hall — .50.

Best apple preserves — Mrs. J. B. Kelly $1.00. Second best — Mrs. John Green — .50.

Best peach preserves — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — $1.00. Second best — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — .50. Third best — Mrs. J. M. Sprunt — Diploma.

Best watermelon — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — $1.00. Second best — Mrs. Thomas Hall — .50. Good specimen were also exhibited by Miss Nancy Cobb and Mrs. Daniel K. Kornegay.

Best citron — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — $1.00. Second best — Mrs. G. W. Middleton — .50. Third best — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best pears — Mrs. J. M. Sprunt — $1.00. Second best — Miss Lizzie Pearsall — .50.

Best apple jelly — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — .50. Second best — Mrs. David M. Pearsall — .25. Fine specimen were also exhibited by Mrs. Dickson Mallard, Mrs. J. B. Kelly, Mrs. D. A. Moore and Miss Nancy Cobb.

Best grape jelly — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — .50. Second best — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .25. Third best — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — Diploma.

Best quince jelly — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best peach jelly — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best persimmon jelly — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.





Best brandy peaches — Mrs. John J. Whitehead — .50. Second best — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .25. Good specimen were also exhibited by Mrs. R. J. Pearsall and Mrs. W. W. Whitehead.

Best brandy whartelberries — Stephen Herring — Diploma.

Best sweet pickles — Miss Alma Faison — .50. Second best — Mrs. John A. Bryan — .25. Third best Mrs. Thomas Hall — Diploma.

Best black berry wine — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50. Second best — Mrs. G. W. Middleton — .25. Third best — Mrs. J. B. Cobb — Diploma.

Best wild grape wine — R. M. Middleton — .50. Second best — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — .25. Third best — Mrs. G. W. Middleton — Diploma.

Best strawberry wine — Mrs. B. Oliver — .50.

Best scuppernong wine — Mrs. D. M. Pearsall — .50. Second best — Mr. James B. Carr — .25. Good specimen were also exhibited by Mrs. R. J. Pearsall and R. M. Middleton.

Best tomato wine — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — .50.

Best cider wine — James B. Carr — Diploma. Second best — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — .50.

Best Cider — Mrs. H. Bowden — Diploma.

Best rasberry cordial — Mrs. N. W. Herring — .50. Fine specimen were also exhibited by Mrs. N. W. Herring. They received diplomas.

Best sugar cane syrup — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best rasberry vinegar — Mrs. J. B. Cobb — Diploma.

Best cider vinegar — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best sour pickles — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — $1.00. Second best — Mrs. Jere Pearsall — .50. Third best — Miss Lizzie Pearsall — .25.

Best pound cake — Mrs. C. D. Hill — .50. Second best — Miss Kate Kelly — .25. Third best — Mrs. H. Bowden — Diploma.

Best jelly cake — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — .50.

Best gold and silver cake — Mrs. D. K. Kornegay — .50.

Best sponge cake — Mrs. D. K. Kornegay — .50.

Best silver cake — Mrs. W. W. Faison — .50.

Best marble cake — Mrs. W. W. Faison — .50.

Best fruit cake — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — Diploma.

Best citron pie — Mrs. G. W. Middleton — .50.

Best potato pie — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50. Second best — Mrs. H. Bowden — .25.

Best homemade candy — Miss Kate Kelly — .50.

Best corn bread — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50.

Best corn pound cake — Mrs. S. B. Winden — .50. Second best — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — Diploma.

Best biscuit — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — .50. Second best — Mrs. H. Bowden — .25.

Best potatoe rolls — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — .50.

Best sugar cake — Mrs. H. Bowden — .50.





Household Fabrics

Best vest pattern — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00. Second best — Mrs. Stephen Herring — .50. Fine patterns were also exhibited by Mrs. P. G. Cook and Mrs. J. W. Outlaw. They received diplomas.

Best coat pattern — Mrs. Stephen Herring — $2.00. Second best — Mrs. H. J. Johnston — $1.00. Third best — Mrs. Solomon Hall — .50. Fine specimen were also exhibited by Mrs. Daniel Bowden, Mrs. John Green, Mrs. John A. Bryan and B. Oliver. They each received a diploma.

Best pants pattern — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $2.00. Second best — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $1.00. Third best — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — .50. Other fine patterns were also exhibited by Miss Nancy Cobb, Mrs. Stephen Herring, Mrs. John A. Bryan, Mrs. B. Oliver, Mrs. J. W. Outlaw, Mrs. Martha Frederick and Mrs. D. J. Middleton. They each received a diploma.

Best made pants — Mrs. D. A. Moore — .50.

Best N. C. Casimine — J. B. Kelly — $2.00.

Best carpeting (homemade) — Mrs. Thomas Hall — $1.00.

Best checks — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — .50.

Best ladies’ homemade robes — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — .50. Two other fine patterns by Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — Diploma.

Best dress pattern — Mrs. Dolly Edwards — $1.00. Second best — Mrs. Martha Frederick — .50. Other fine patterns were exhibited by Mrs. Stephen Herring, Mrs. R. S. Stanly and Mrs. John Green. They each received a diploma.

Best wool socks — Mrs. B. Oliver — .50. Second best — Mrs. B. Oliver — Diploma.

Best wire grass hat — G. W. Middleton — .50.

Best bed quilt — Miss Dolly Moore — $4.00. Second best — Miss Eliza Southerland — $3.00. Third best — Miss Ann E. Kenan — $2.00. Fourth best — Mrs. Eliza Southerland — $1.00. Fifth best — Mrs. T. W. Boney — .50.

A white quilt — Miss Sarah Hawes — $1.00.

A silk quilt composed of 3474 pieces — Mrs. D. W. Jones — $1.00. Other very handsome quilts by Mrs. T. W. Boney, Mrs. Jere Pearsall, Mrs. H. B. Hurst, Mrs. Daniel T. Boney, Mrs. J. W. Outlaw and Miss Ann E. Kenan. They each received a diploma.

Best woolen counterpane — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — $2.00. Second best — D. K. Kornegay — $1.00. Third best — Mrs. D. A. Moore — Diploma. Fourth best — Mrs. James Kornegay — Diploma. Other very handsome counterpanes were exhibited by Mrs. D. A. Moore, Mrs. John A. Bryan, Mrs. Daniel Bowden, Miss Mary Southerland, Miss Eliza Southerland, Mrs. Solomon Hall, 2 by Miss Martha Frederick, 2 by Mrs. C. B. McGowen and Miss Martendale. They each received a diploma.

Best cotton knit counterpane — Mrs. D. W. Jones — $2.00. Second best — Miss Emma F. Williams — $1.00.

Best cotton woven counterpane — Mrs. A. M. Faison — $2.00. Second best — Mrs. John A. Bryan — $1.00. Third best — Mrs. Thomas Hall — Diploma. Fourth best — Mrs. J. W. Outlaw — Diploma.





Other very handsome counterpanes were exhibited by Mrs. Daniel Bowden, 2 by Miss Martha Frederick, 2 by Mrs. Abner Faison — Mrs. D. K. Kornegay — Mrs. J. C. Mallard, Mrs. J. W. Outlaw, Mrs. James Kornegay, Mrs. Solomon Hall, and Miss Martendale.

Best bed spread — Miss Martha Frederick — .50. Second best — Mrs. Daniel Bowden — .25.

Best bed valince — Mrs. J. C. Mallard — Diploma.

Handsome worked table cover — Miss Mag Spear — .50.

Best pan ottoman covers — Mrs. D. M. Pearsall — .50. Second best — Miss May Spear — .25. Third best — Miss E. F. Williams — Diploma.

Best sofa pillow — Miss Em. F. Williams — Diploma.

Best tidy (thread) — Mrs. James E. Hall — .25.

Best tidy (cotton) — Mrs. James E. Hall — .25. Second best — Miss Malissa Boney — Diploma. Third best — Miss Emma Pearsall — Diploma. A very handsome wonted tidy by Miss J. Stallon — Diploma.

Best pinchushion — Mrs. C. D. Hill — Diploma. Second best — Mrs. C. V. Devane — Diploma.

Best child's embroidered dress — Mrs. C. D. Hill — $2.00. Second best — Miss Catherine Frederick — $1.00. Third best — Mrs. John D. Southerland — Diploma.

Best misses embroidered dress — Miss Nancy Cobb — $2.00.

Best needle worked collar — Miss Lizzie Dickson — $2.00. Second best — Miss Nancy Cobb — $1.00. Third best — Mrs. D. M. Pearsall — Diploma. Fourth best — Miss Dolly Moore — Diploma.

Best jaconet embroidery — Miss Almera Faison — .50. Second best — Miss Cordena Faison — .25. Third best — Miss Alice Dickson — Diploma.

Needle worked pantleletts — Miss Martha Frederick — .25.

Ladies’ tape worked skirt — Miss Sue Beaman — .50.

Needle worked cape — Miss Nancy Cobb — .50. Fine specimen of various kinds of needle work were exhibited by Miss Mary Black, Mrs. N. W. Herring, Miss Fanny Jones, Mrs. Abner Faison, Mrs. T. B. Kelly, Mrs. C. V. Devane, Miss Fanny Russell and Mrs. J. W. Outlaw.

Best tidies (zephyr work) — Miss C. Sprunt — .25. Second best — Miss Kittie Farrior — Diploma.

Best shawl (zephyr) — Miss Eugenia Hussey — .25.

Child's embroidered sack — Miss Mary J. Newall — .50.

Best zephyr undersleves — Miss Kate S. Kelly — .25. Second best — Miss Betty Middleton — Diploma. Third best — Miss Bettie Farrior — Diploma.

Zephyr head dress — Bettie Middleton — .25.

Zephyr necklace — Miss Ann Bryan — Diploma.

Zephyr watch case — Bettie O. Pearsall — Diploma.

Zephyr Ottoman cover — Miss Vic. Dickson — Diploma.

Ottoman — Mrs. R. J. Pearsall — Diploma.

Infant's bonnett — Mrs. A. T. Stanford — .50.

Best crochet collar — Miss Mary S. Bortick — Diploma. Second best — Miss Lucy Pearsall — Diploma.





Best lamp mats — Mrs. C. D. Hill — Diploma. Second best — Miss M. E. Kenan — Diploma. Third best — Miss Mary A. Kenan — Diploma. Fourth best — Mrs. J. B. Kelly — Diploma. Fifth best — Miss Mary Bundy — Diploma.

Shell box — Mrs. A. M. Faison — Diploma.

Silk nite cap — Miss Virginia Beasley — Diploma.

Painting And Flowers

Best oil painting — Mrs. William B. Jones — $1.00.

Best crayon drawing — Mrs. William B. Jones — $1.00.

Best oriental — Miss Alice Dickson — Diploma. There were other paintings by Mrs. W. B. Jones and two paintings by Miss S. Miller. They received diplomas for these.

Best vase of flowers — Miss C. Sprunt — $1.00. Second best — Miss Isabella Sprunt — Diploma.

Manufactures

Best N. C. made buggy — Dibble & Brothers — $3.00. Second best — Dibble & Brothers — $1.00.

Best rockaway buggy — Dibble & Brothers — Diploma.

Mr. Dibble & Bros. and George A. Newell, Esqr., exhibited a number of fine carriages, rockaways and buggies of superior quality of Northern manufacture.

Best 2-horse N. C. made coutler — Giles Clute — $2.00.

Best N. C. made plow — P. T. Cook — $2.00. Second best — R. H. Farlow — $1.00. Third best — H. Bowden — .50.

Best 2-horse plow (NC) — John C. Mallard — $1.00.

Best singletree (NC) — R. H. Farlow — .50.

Best pair horse hames (NC) — R. H. Farlow — .50.

Best pea dropper (NC) — George T. Bennett — $3.00.

Best corn and cotton cultivator (NC) — George T. Bennett — $3.00.

Best 4-horse wagon (NC) — William B. Middleton — $2.00.

Best horse cart (NC), — R. H. Farlow — $2.00.

Best ax helve — George W. Middleton — .25.

Best N. C. amo leather — G. A. Newell — $1.00. Second best — G. W. Middleton — .50.

Best wash machine — John A. Bryan — $3.00.

Best key basket — W. Dickson Carr — .50.

Best pair N. C. boots — John P. Wallace — $1.00.

Best set single buggy harness — George A. Newell — $2.00.

Best drawing knife — Ehpraim Boney — .50.

Best round saw — Ephraim Boney — .25.

Horses

Best stallion — O. R. Kenan — $4.00.

Best brood mare — C. D. Hill — $4.00. Second best — Jere Pearsall — $3.00. Third best — John H. Carr — $2.00. Fourth best —





Stephen Graham — $1.00. Fifth best — William B. Middleton — Diploma.

Fine brood mares were also exhibited by R. B. Carr, D. T. Boney; D. C. Moore, D. J. Middleton, W. W. Whitehead, J. J. Whitehead, G. T. Lofton, Abner M. Faison and William E. Hill.

Colts

Best 1 year old colt — Ward Kornegay — $2.00. Second best — Everil Herring — $1.00.

Best 2 year old colt — M. J. Faison — $2.00.

Fine colts were also exhibited by R. B. Carr, D. C. Moore, J. C. Mallard, Abner M. Faison, Davis Cottle and R. K. Williams.

Best mare and colt — D. C. Moore — $2.00.

Best mule and colt — William E. Hill — $2.00.

Best pair mules — E. J. Faison — $2.00. Second best — R. J. Pearsall — $1.00. Third best — D. C. Moore — Diploma.

Best jack — D. C. Moore — $2.00.

Also fine mules were exhibited by George McClammy and William E. Hill.

Traveling Horses

Best pair carriage horses — E. H. Stanley — $2.00. Second best — Dr. R. W. Ward — $1.00.

Fastest pair horses (time 2 min. 56 sec.) — J. P. Cobb — $2.00.

Best family horse — Dr. R. W. Ward — $2.00. Second best — C. Patrick — $1.00. Third best — W. W. Whitehead — Diploma.

Best trotter under saddle (2 min. 54 sec.) — John Barden — $2.00.

Best trotter in harness (2 minutes 56 seconds) — Edward Southerland — $2.00. Second best — (2 minutes 59 seconds) — John Barden — $1.00. Third best — (3 minutes 47 seconds) — W. W. Whitehead — .50.

Best pacing horse (2 minutes 47 seconds) — S. S. Carroll — $2.00. Second best — (2 minutes 48 seconds) — George W. Lamb — $1.00.

Cattle

Best Devon bull — William A. Faison — $3.00. Second best — A. M. Faison — $2.00.

Best Durham bull — William E. Hill — $3.00. Second best — William B. Middleton — $2.00.

Best graded bull — C. D. Hill — $3.00. Second best — William E. Hill — $2.00.

Best Durham and Devon — D. K. Kornegay — $2.00.

Best Durham bull yearling — A. M. Faison — $1.00.

Best native bull and heifer — D. C. Moore — $2.00.

Best native bull calf — J. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Best Durham cow and calf — M. J. Faison — $3.00.

Best Devon cow and calf — A. M. Faison — $3.00. Second best — D. K. Kornegay — $2.00. Third best — William A. Faison — $2.00.





Best Devon cow and twin calves — M. J. Faison $2.00.

Best Devon heifer — William A. Faison — $2.00. Second best — A. M. Faison — $1.00.

Best Aireshire heifer — William A. Faison — $2.00.

Best Durham heifer — William A. Faison — $2.00. Second best — William A. Faison — $2.00.

Best native heifer — D. M. Pearsall — $2.00. Second best — D. C. Moore — $1.00.

Best bull, cow and calf — M. J. Faison — $2.00.

Best milch cow — D. K. Kornegay — $5.00. Second best — A. M. Faison — $4.00. Third best — D. C. Moore — $3.00. Fourth best — M. J. Faison — $2.00. Fifth best — William E. Hill — $1.00. Sixth best — M. J. Faison — .50. Seventh best — D. C. Moore — Diploma.

Best yoke oxen — A. M. Faison — $3.00.

Very fine cattle were also exhibited by David Brown, George W. Middleton, and William Dickson Carr.

Hogs

Best lot large hogs (6) — D. C. Moore — $3.00. Second best lot — (7) William B. Middleton — $2.00. Third best — (17) J. B. Kelly — $1.00.

Pages lost here . . . . .

Best Shanghair chickens — Alfred Hollingsworth — .50. Second best — Alfred Hollingsworth — .50.

Best English ducks — Thomas Hall — .50. Second best — Thomas Hall — .50.

Best Bertham chickens — B. W. Stanford — .50. Second best — Alfred Hollingsworth — .25.

Best pair Tuftid Russian Chicks — D. Mallard — .50.

Four horned native sheep — J. C. McMillan — $1.00.

(Pages lost here from original manuscript.)





MEETING — JANUARY, 1861

The Society met at the courthouse in Kenansville on the 5th day of January 1861, (regular time).

A quorum being present, the society proceeded to business. The resolutions offered by Maj. Jeremiah Pearsall are laid over, to be considered at the next meeting.

On motion, it was ordered that the secretary of this society be requested to mail one list of the premiums to each member of this society.

On motion, it was ordered that the executive committee for the next year be appointed by this meeting, when the following gentlemen were appointed said committee for the year 1861: Isaac B. Kelly, Jeremiah Pearsall, Henry B. Hurst, Daniel T. Boney, Thomas Hall, John W. Gillespie and John A. Bryan.

On motion the society adjourned to meet at the regular time the 1st Saturday in April next.

Dickson Mallard, Sec.

MEETING — APRIL, 1861

The society met according to adjournment the 1st Saturday in April 1861.

The meeting was called to order by president and on motion, Thomas L. Kenan was appointed secretary pro-tem.

On motion of O. R. Kenan the applicants for premiums on model farms shall give notice of their intention to compete to the president by the first Saturday in July next.

On motion of H. Bowden, all competitors be required to state the manner of cultivation etc.

On motion, H. Bowden and James Dickson were added to the list of the committee on model farms and on motion the president was also added.

On motion of Col. J. J. Whitehead the resignation of T. L. Kenan as chief marshal was accepted and J. D. Southerland was appointed his successor.

On motion of H. Bowden the following question was proposed for debate at the next meeting.

Which would be the more beneficial to the county, to purchase concentrated manures or to exfund the same amount of money in the manufacture of home manures.

On motion the society adjourned to meet at the next regular time, 1st Saturday in July next.

Thomas L. Kenan

Sec. pro-tem





(FOLLOWING CLOSE OF WAR
BETWEEN THE STATES)
DUPLIN AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY
REORGANIZED — 1865

At a called meeting of the citizens of Duplin County for the purpose of re-organizing the Duplin Agricultural Society October 29th, 1865, Jeremiah Pearsall was called to the chair and Dickson Mallard acted as secretary.

On motion the sum of two dollars set the amount to be paid by each member when called for.

MEETING — OCTOBER, 1865

Members of the re-organization:

Jeremiah Pearsall, Benjamin Oliver, A. M. Faison, N. W. Herring, W. H. Williams, S. M. Grady, M. D. Daney, C. Jernigan, S. H. Carr, J. P. Faison, J. S. Devane, A. G. Mosely, J. R. Hurst, James Dickson, F. Shine, L. S. Kornegay, Y. Hodges, George M. Hall, D. M. Justine, Isaac B. Kelly, Lewis Herring, R. M. Middleton, J. W. Taylor, John R. Miller, Ivy Smith, W. B. Ward, H. Bowden, Louis Froeluk, William B. Middleton, David Brown.

William T. Sandlin, William A. Allen, John W. Hinson, Thomas J. Bostic, R. H. Tanlain, Joe Lofton, A. J. Brown, J. M. Sprunt, James G. Dickson, J. D. Southerland, John M. Chasten, L. Carr, S. L. Gariss, George W. Carroll, Edward Pearsall, John A. Bryan, James B. Carr, Edward W. Houston, David J. Middleton, Richard Miller, David M. Pearsall, David M. Pearsall, David F. Chambers, Charles F. Williams, John Q. McGowen, Clem Gillespie, Thomas Hall, Alex D. McGowen, George W. Middleton, Joseph Pearsall, John J. Whitehead, Jonotham Chestnutt, Hiram Sawyer, George A. Newell, Owen R. Kenan, Robert Brown, John C. Mallard, John D. Stanford, Herman V. Houston, David Spicer, John A. McArthur, S. Graham, H. Grimes, C. W. Graham.

OFFICERS ELECTED FOR 1866

In the reorganizing of this society the following persons were elected for one year from this date.

Benjamin Oliver, president; H. Bowden and William R. Ward, vice presidents; Dickson Mallard, recording secretary; A. G. Mosely, corresponding secretary; N. W. Herring, treasurer.

When a motion a committee of three be appointed to repair the fair grounds when J. B. Kelly, William B. Middleton was appointed that committee, and it be their duty to solicit members to the society for the prosperity and advancement of agricultural and mechanical pursuits in our community.





Also a committee of two were appointed in each captain's precinct for the purpose of soliciting members to this society and otherwise promoting the good of the society when the following persons were elected to that committee:

The Society then discussed at some length the changed condition of the society in our midst. It was recommended that no lands be rented to negroes, but that they be hired at good wages and paid promptly, also that contracts with negroes be written.

There being no other business before the Society it adjourned to meet the 1st Saturday in January 1866.

D. Mallard, Rec. Sec.






[Illustration:

MISS MACY COX
...with original manuscript of the Duplin County Agricultural Society

]









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